The British Essayists: Connoisseur

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Page 143 - As to his body there can be no dispute; but examine even the acquirements of his mind, you will find them all contribute in their order towards furnishing out an exact dress : to instance no more ; is not religion a cloak, honesty a pair of shoes worn out in the dirt, selflove a surtout, vanity a shirt, and conscience a pair of breeches, which, though a cover for lewdness as well ag nastinesa, is easily slipt down for the service of both...
Page 47 - We also wrote our lovers' names upon bits of paper, and rolled them up in clay, and put them into water ; and the first that rose up was to be our valentine. Would you think it ? — Mr Blossom was my man. I lay a-bed and shut my eyes all the morning, till he came to our house ; for I would not have seen another man before him for all the world.
Page 173 - The corners of the room full of the best chose hunting and hawking poles ; an oyster table at the lower end, which was of constant use twice a day all the year round, for he never failed to eat oysters before dinner and supper through all seasons: the neighbouring town of Poole supplied him with them.
Page 214 - With these we may likewise rank the affected tribe of mimics, who are constantly taking off the peculiar tone of voice or gesture of their acquaintance: though they are such wretched imitators, that, like bad painters, they are frequently forced to write the name under the picture, before we can discover any likeness.
Page 215 - ... with no less pain, into the ears of their auditors. These should be suffered only to syringe, as it were, the ears of a deaf man, through a...
Page 54 - That the Earth very narrowly escaped a Brush from the Tail of the last Comet, which would have infallibly reduced it to Ashes ; and that the next, which they have calculated for one and thirty Years hence, will probably destroy us.
Page 202 - Our house — beholders would adore, Was there a level lawn before; Nothing its views to incommode. But quite laid open to the road ; While ev'ry trav'ller, in amaze, Should on our little mansion gaze, And, pointing to the choice retreat, Cry, " That's Sir Thrifty 's country-seat.
Page 196 - ... while the gentleman who fills it, is exalted in the midst of all this finery, with a surplice as dirty as a farmer's frock, and a periwig that seems to have transferred its faculty of curling to the band which appears in full buckle beneath it.
Page 197 - ... and cracking nuts in autumn, is no part of the religious ceremony. The good old practice of psalm-singing is, indeed, wonderfully improved in many country churches since the days of Sternhold and Hopkins ; and there is scarce a parish-clerk, who has so little taste as not to pick his staves out of the New Version. This has occasioned great complaints in some places, where the clerk has been forced to bawl by himself, because the rest of the congregation cannot find the psalm at the end of their...
Page 218 - twere vain to follow, For dog and horse he'd beat them hollow ; — Nay, if he put forth all his strength, Outstrip his brethren half a length. A tortoise heard his vain oration, And vented thus his indignation : " O puss ! it bodes thee dire disgrace When I defy thee to the race. Come, 'tis a match ; nay, no denial, I lay my shell upon the trial.

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