Childhood's End

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RosettaBooks, Nov 30, 2012 - Fiction - 258 pages
92 Reviews
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In the Retro Hugo Award–nominated novel that inspired the Syfy miniseries, alien invaders bring peace to Earth—at a grave price: “A first-rate tour de force” (The New York Times).
 
In the near future, enormous silver spaceships appear without warning over mankind’s largest cities. They belong to the Overlords, an alien race far superior to humanity in technological development. Their purpose is to dominate Earth. Their demands, however, are surprisingly benevolent: end war, poverty, and cruelty. Their presence, rather than signaling the end of humanity, ushers in a golden age . . . or so it seems.
 
Without conflict, human culture and progress stagnate. As the years pass, it becomes clear that the Overlords have a hidden agenda for the evolution of the human race that may not be as benevolent as it seems.
 
“Frighteningly logical, believable, and grimly prophetic . . . Clarke is a master.” —Los Angeles Times
 

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User Review  - john257hopper - LibraryThing

This is another awe inspiring novel by the British SF master. Mysterious aliens appear in the sky over Earth and somehow become benevolent dictators over the whole planet. But the aliens' own motives ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - jdaneway - LibraryThing

I loved this book and may have to add it to my favorites. If you like studies in consciousness and alien contact, this is for you. There's a clever twist about human bias and preconceptions. I believe ... Read full review

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About the author (2012)

Clarke is widely revered as one of the most influential science fiction writers of the 20th century, esteemed alongside Isaac Asimov and Robert Heinlein, a trio known informally as the “Big Three.” Before his death in 2008, he authored more than 100 novels, novellas, and short story collections and laid the groundwork for science fiction as we know it today. Combining scientific knowledge and visionary literary aptitude, Clarke’s work explored the implications of major scientific discoveries in astonishingly inventive and mystical settings. Clarke’s short stories and novels have won numerous Hugo and Nebula Awards, have been translated into more than 30 languages, and have sold millions of copies worldwide. Several of his books, including 2001: A Space Odyssey and 2010: Odyssey II, have been adapted into films that still stand as classic examples of the genre. Without a doubt, Arthur C. Clarke is one of the most important voices in contemporary science fiction literature.

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