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CHAP. VIII.
Of the Goat, Rabbit, Hare, Dormouse, Deer,

and various other Animals, that are or may
be subjected to British Agriculture

· 1071

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CHAP. IX Animals of the Bird Kind employed in Agriculture

1083 1. Poultry Houses and their Furniture and Utensils

1083 II. Gallinaceous Fowls, their Kinds, Breeding, Rearing, and Management

108+ 111. Anserine or Aquatic Fowls

1091 IV. Diseases of Poultry

1095 V. Birds of Luxury which are or may be cul. tivated by Fariners

1095

CHAP. X.
Fish and Amphibious Animals subjected to
Cultivation

. 1100

CHAP. V. The Dairy and its Management

1035 1. Chemical Principles of Milk, and the Proper.

ties of the Milk of ditferent Animals II. The Dairy House, its Furniture and Uten. sils

1037 JII. Milking and the general Management of Milk

1010 IV. Making and Curing of Butter

1011 1. Process of Cheese-making

1043 VI. Catalogue of the different sorts of Cheeses and other Preparations made from Milk 1015

CUAP. VI. The Sheep

1049 1. Varieties of Sheep

1019 11. Criteria of Properties in Sheep

1052 III. Breeding of Sheep

1053 IV. Rearing and general Management of Sheep

1055 1. Rearing and Management of Sheep on

rich grass and arable Lands
2. Rearing and general Management of

Sheep on Hilly and Mountainous Dis-
tricts, or what is generally termed Store
Sheep Husbandry

1058 V. Folding of Sheep VI. Of Fattening Sheep and Lambs

1062 VII. Probable Improvement to be derived

from Crosses of the Merino Breed of
Sheep

1003 VIII. Anatomy and Physiology of Sheep 1064 IX. Diseases of Sheep

100+ CHAP. VII. The Swine

1007 1 Varieties of the Common Hog

1069 II. Breeding and Rearing of Swine

1069

- 1056

CAP. XI. Insects and Worms which are or may be sub jected to Culture

. 1104

- 1061

CHAP. XII. Animals noxious to Agriculture

1108 1. Noxious Mammalia

. 1108 II. Birds injurious to Agriculture

1112 III. Insects injurious to Agriculture

. 1112 1. Physiology of lusects

1112 2. Arrangement or Classification of Insects 1113 S. Insects injurious to live Stock

. 1114 4. Insects injurious to Vegetables

- 1115 5. Insects injurious to Food, Clothing, &c. 1118 6. Operations for subduing Insects . 1119 IV. Worm-like Animals injurious to Agri. culture

1120

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PART IV.

STATISTICS OF BRITISH AGRICULTURE

. 1219 . 1221

BOOK I.

OF TIIS PRESENT STATE OF AGRICULTURE IN THE

BRITISII ISLES.

2. Bibliography of German Agriculture
3. Bibliography of Italian Agriculture
4. Bibliography of the Agriculture of other
Countries of Europe

1222 5. Agricultural Bibliography of North Ame. rica

1223

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CHAP. I.
Different Descriptions of Men engaged in the
Practice or Pursuit of Agriculture

1121 I. Operators, or serving Agriculturists 1121 II. Commercial Agriculturists

1122 III. Agricultural Counsellors, Artists, or Professors

1193 IV. Patrons of Agriculture

1123 CHAP. II. Different kinds of Farms in Britain relatively

to the different Classes of Society who are the Occupiers

CHAP. III. Topographical Survey of the British Isles in respect to Agriculture

1125 1. Agricultural Survey of England

1125 JI. Agricultural Survey of Wales

. 1173 111, Agricultural Survey of Scotland . 1178 IV. Agricultural Survey of Ireland

. 1198

- 1124

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BOOK II.

OF THE FUTURE PROGRESS OF AGRICULTURE IN

BRITAIN

CHAP. I.
Improvement of Agriculture, by refining the

Taste of the Purchasers of its Products, and
creasing the Knowledge of Agricultural
Patrons

1225

CHAP. II.
Improvement of Agriculture, by the better

Education of those who are engaged in it as
a Profession

1024 1. Degree of Knowledge which may be at.

tained by Practical Men, and general Powers

of the human Mind as to Attainments II. Professional Education of Agriculturists - 1228 III. Conduct and Economy of an Agricul. turist's Life

1229

- 1996

1283
1241
1948

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WITH NEARLY TEN THOUSAND ENGRAVINGS ON WOOD, Complete in One large Volume, 8vo. Price 41. 14s. 6d. bds.; or in Nine Parts, 10s. 64

each ; or Thirty-six Numbers, 2s. 6d. each, for the convenience of those who prefer taking the Work in small portions from the beginning:

AN ENCYCLOPÆDIA OF PLANTS;

COMPRISING

THIE DESCRIPTION, SPECIFIC CHARACTER, CULTURE,

HISTORY, APPLICATION IN THE ARTS, AND EVERY OTHER DESIRABLE PARTI LLAR RESPECTING ALL THE PLANTS INDIGENOUS

CULTIVATED IN, OR INTRODUCED TO BRITAIN: Combining all the Advantages of a Linnean and a Jussieuean Species Plantarum, a Historia Plantarum, a Grammar of Botany, and a Dictionary of Botany and Vegetable Culture. The whole in Eriglish, with The Synonyms of the commoner Plants, in the different European and other Languages; the Scient se Names accentuated, their Etymologies explained; the Classes, Orders, and Botanical Terms illustrated by Engravings; and with Figures of nearly Ten Thousand Species, exemplifying several Individuis belonging to every Genus included in the Work.

EDITED BY J. C. LOUDON, F.L.S. H.S., &c.
The Specific Characters, &c. by John Lindley, F.R.S. L. S. and G.S., &c.

The Drawings by J. D. C. SowerEY, F.L.S. ; and

The Engravings by R. BRANSTON.

" Our general impression of the work is, that, taking it altogether, it is the most extraordinary that has yet appeared on any branch of science. Extraordinary for the immense mass of information con. densed in so small a space; extraordinary for the number and beauty of the engravings, and for the extent of letterpress; and extraordinary for the moderate price at which it is sold. We have the essence of what, in the last edition of Millar's Dictionary, occupies four folio volumes; in Sowerby's Botani, plates to the value of 501.; and in the Botanical Magazine, and Botanical Register, plates which sell for upwards of 2001. ; besides a quantity of original matter, to which we shall presently refer, and upwards of 20 engravings of plants which have never before been figured in this or in any other publication. These engravings are made from dried specimens in the herbarums of Mr. Lambert and of Mr. Lindley, and from living plants in the collection of Messrs. Lodding; and are not only an important addition to botanical literature, but of themselves render the work a tesideratum to the scientific botanical collector. On the whole, Loudon's Encyclopædia of Plants is a most invaluable addition to our literature: it will be more useful to beginners, and more instructive to general readers, than any botanical work in any lan. guage, and it will be as indispensable in a well-selected general library as an English or Latin dictionary." -Lil. Gazette.

" With the · Encyclopædia of Plants' for a companion, which speaks of every vegetable production, "from the celar of Lebanon to the hyssop which groweth on the wall,' we could range with enthusiastic delight, through groves and gardens, in the pathless forest, the broad savannah, or the mountain gled; and could find society, where none intrudes,' in the sweet companionship of flowers, from their earliest germ to the full expansion of their beauties in the suinmer's sun. There are two ways in which the study may be pursued; and one of these, at least the study of botanical prints and drawings, has little chance of coming into disrepute so long as the arts continue to advance, as they are now doing, in accuracy of design and brilliancy of execution. In this way, by having a numerous collection of goodi engravings, and descriptions of them, such as the work before us amply supplies, it is quite possible to learn and know a great deal of botany without ever seeing a living flower, or without ever experiencing the delight of a botanical excursion in the country. The Encyclopædia of Plants' cannot fail to be an excellent guide ; for the accuracy of the descriptive details will enable the student to identify every plant he meets with, from the forest tree to the tiniest moss; and without such minute knowledge it is impossible to proceed far in philosophical experiment and discovery. There is one feature of the descriptive portion of the work, to which we would call particular attention, as perfectly original, and exceedingly ingenious and useful. We are sorry that we cannot exemplify this, as its merits depend upon peculiar types, cast on purpose for the work, by means of which a plant can be described in a space incredibly small

. Upon this invention, indeed, the cheapness of the book mainly depends, as it saves some hundreds of pages of letter. press; and as the types are hieroglyphic, they speak to the eye, and are equally, if not more distinct, than words at length. The extent to which condensed description, and, we may add, condensed engravings have been carried in the work before us, appears little short of miraculous, as the reader will the more readily comprehend from the fact, that it would require several hundred pounds' worth of books to furnish all the information given here for four guineas and a half. The engravings alone, indeed, must have cost, we should imagine, eight or ten thousand pounds, and the other expenses probably amount to a similar sum. Altogether we never saw so extraordinary a book; as every body, from the most illiterate gardener to the most erudite botanist, must be astonished at the multitudinous mass of information it contains in so small a compass. In fact, it appears to us not a whit less wonderful than the fabled story of the Iliad in a nut-shell." - Monthly Rericu'.

“ We should convey a very imperfect idea of the Encyclopædia of Plants, were we only to mention that it contains the generic and specific characters of 16,712 species of plants which have grown on British soil. These characters are accompanied by figures of nearly 10,000 of the plants, engraved on wood. When we say that these are executed from drawings by Mr. J. D. c. Sowerby, expressly for the work, it will be at once conceived that their execution is good. It is indeed excellent; and considering the necessary smallness of the figures, they are highly characteristic. The whole, we may confidently assert, forms a book perfectly sui generis. The quantity of matter is truly astonishing; and the entire publica. tion is offered at a price so moderate (four and a half guincas) that we can hardly dare to hope it will do more than cover the expenses of the public-spirited booksellers, who have spared no cost to render it, what we confidently pronounce it to be, the most useful and the most popular botanical work that has ever appeared in the English language." -Jameson's Edin, New Phil. Journ.

By the same Author.

AN ENCYCLOPÆDIA OF GARDENING;

COMPRISING

THE THEORY AND PRACTICE OF HORTICULTURE, FLORICULTURE,

ARBORICULTURE, AND LANDSCAPE GARDENING; Including all the latest Improvements; a General History of Gardening in all Countries; and a Statistical

View of its present State, with Suggestions for its future Progress in the British Isles.

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A CATALOGUE OF ALL THE PLANTS INDIGENOUS, CULTIVATED IN, OR

INTRODUCED TO BRITAIN.

In 8vo. price 11. Is. cloth boards.
Part I. — The Linnæan Arrangement, in which nearly Thirty Thousand Species are enumerated ; with

the Systematic Name and Authority, Accentuation, Derivation of Generic Names, Literal English
and Specific Names, Synonymes Systematic and English of both Genera and Species, Habit, Habitation
in the Garden, Indigenous Habitation, Popular Character, Height, Time of Flowering, Colour of the
Flower, Mode of Propagation, Soil, Native Country, Year of Introduction, and Reference to Figures;

preceded by an Introduction to the Linnæan System.
Part II. – The Jussieuean Arrangement of nearly Four Thousand Genera ; with an Introduction to the

Natural System, and a General Description and History of each Order.
The Linnæan Arrangement and its Supplement are entirely the work of Mr. George Don; the Natural

Arrangement is founded on that of Professor LINDLEY, with some Additions and Alterations rendered
necessary by the plan of this Catalogue; and Dr. GREVILLE, the profound Cryptogamist, assisted in
arranging the Cryptogàmia.

In Course of Publication.

Nos. I. to XXXII. Price 3s. 6d. each (continued in Numbers every Two Months),

and Vols. I. to VI. Price 51. Is. 6d. bds., of

THE GARDENER'S MAGAZINE,

AND

REGISTER OF RURAL AND DOMESTIC IMPROVEMENT.

CONDUCTED BY J. C. LOU DON, F.L.S. HS., &c.

In 8vo. every Two Months, alternately with the GARDENER'S MAGAZINE,

Price 3s. 6d. per Number,
THE MAGAZINE OF NATURAL HISTORY,

AND

JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY, BOTANY, MINERALOGY,

AND METEOROLOGY.

GEOLOGY,

CONDUCTED BY J. C. LOUDON, F.L.S. H.S., &c.

The different Departments edited by Gentlemen eminent in each. The Drawings of

Botany and Conchology, by SowERBY ; of Animals, by HARVEY; of Trees, by
Strutt: and the Engravings on Wood, by BRANSTON.

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Vols. I. to III. Price 21. 17s. boards; and Nos. I. to XIX., have already appeared. PUBLISHED BY LONGMAN, REES, ORME, BROWN, AND GREEY,

A NEW GENERAL ATLAS OF FIFTY-THREE MAPS,

WITH THE DIVISIONS AND BOUNDARIES CAREFULLY COLOURED.
CONSTRUCTED ENTIRELY FROM NEW DRAWINGS, AND ENGRAVED BY

SIDNEY HALL,
(Complete in 17 Monthly Parts, any of which may be had separately, price 10s. 6d. each.)
Folded in half, and pasted on Guards, in strong canvass and lettered
Half-bound, Russia backs, corners, and lettered
In the full-extended size of the Maps, half-bound, Russia backs, corners, and lettered ..... 10 0
Proots on India Paper, half-bound, Russia backs, corners, and lettered

14 5 We have taken some pains to examine this New Atlas, and we can safely state our conviction of general superiority to all other Atlases." — The Sphynx (conducted by J. S. Buckinghamn, Esq.'.

“ The best and most recent authorities are in all cases consulted; and the maps are engraved is masterly manner." —New Monthly Magazine.

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ALSO,

AN ALPHABETICAL INDEX,

OF ALL

THE NAMES CONTAINED IN THE ABOVE ATLAS, WITH REFERENCES TO THE NUMBER OF THE MAPS, AND THE LATITUDE AND LONGITUDE IN WHICH THE

PLACES ARE TO BE FOUND. In One volume, royal octavo, price One Guinea; and supplied to the Subscribers to the Atlas at the cost price, the Proprietors being desirous of rendering the work the most perfect of its kind extant

A SYSTEM OF UNIVERSAL GEOGRAPHY. BY M. MALTE-BRUN, EDITOR OF THE “ ANNALES DES VOYAGES."

Parts I. ro XVI. PRICE 7s. 6d. EACH. The work is now finished in the original ; but in order to render it a more complete System of Geography for the English reader, large additions will be made to the description of Great Britain, which is now in progress, and will be published in a few months.

“We think the translators of M. Malte-Brun's Geography have done good service to the public, by rendering so valuable a work accessible to the English reader." - Edinburgh Rericu.

" Infinitely superior to any thing of its class which has ever appeared.”- Literary Gazette.

THE EDINBURGH GAZETTEER;
Or, COMPENDIOUS GEOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY:

CONTAINING

A Description of the various Countries, Kingdoms, States, Cities, Towns, Mountains, Seas, Rivers, Harbours, &c. of the World ; an Account of the Government, Customs, and Religion, of the Inhabitants; the Boundaries and Natural Productions of each Country, &c.; forming a complete body of Geography, Physical, Political, Statistical, and Commercial. Abridged from the larger work in six volumes. The 2d edit. brougbt down to the present time. In 1 large vol. 8vo. (with Maps), 18s. bds.

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Brought down to the Present Time. Complete in six vols. price 51. 5s. bds.

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A NEW GENERAL ATLAS, CONSTRUCTED BY A. ARROWSMITH, HYDROGRAPHER TO THE KING; From the latest Authorities ; comprehended in 54 Maps, including Two new Maps, from Original Drawings, with recent Discoveries. In royal 4to. 11. 168. half-bound; or coloured, 21. 12s. 6d.

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