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but oh! can Wheelock be forgotten? is it possible? shall not our sorrows bleed afresh at every remembrance of his name? And oh ! how are we surrounded with monitors and memorandums of his name and virtues. No, while the plains of Hanover, late the rough, and almost unpassable retreat of savage beasts of prey, thick set with lofty pines, which overtop the clouds, owing chiefly, under God, to his arduous labor, and divine skill, lie smooth beneath our feet, and, drest with beauteous green, salute our eyes with a most beautiful prospect, while Dartmouth, or any of her sons remain alive; while Hanover or any one stone upon another remains of her buildings, not thrown down; while any vestage of Hanover, Dartmouth, or her extensive influence remains, so long shall the name and fame of our dear departed friend be remembered. I might then protract my mournful strain, without fear of offending--grief looses its nature, turns to joy, when vented on a proper'occasion. Proportion of things is beautiful to the rational mind--weeping pleasant, when there is great occasion for it; the effect proportionate to the cause.

Look away from me, I will weep bitterly-labor not to comfort me, saith the prophet. My resolution is like his—’tis profitable too as well as pleasant. Such wounds, says Dr. Young, oftner heal too soon, than bleed too long."

Doctor Wheelock's fidelity in the management of money, was never called in question by any acquainted with the business of the school. He was always careful to apply all monies for the particular purpose for which they were given. He considered every donation as a sacred deposit, and frequently called it the Lord's money, or Christ's money. The failure of that full success of his plans to evangelize the heathen, which thine hand findeth to do (for time meaning) do it with thy might.” The motive or argument to enforce the exhortation is, “ for there is no work, nor device, nor knowledge, nor wisdom, in the grave whither thou goest;" intimating, that good men, while life lasts, are employed in works, and devices, of knowledge and wisdom; plans wisely laid, and vigorously prosecuted, for the advancement of the divine glory, and the good of mankind; and oh ! how did our dear deceased friend, while he lived, abound in all these. Did we ever know such wisdom, policy, and holy skill, joined with such faith, courage, and resolution, to effect the most important and benevolent purposes of this kind, as were conspicuous in him? But oh! how sad is the thought, they are all ceased, all at an end; ceased, ceased forever. No more, O Dartmouth ! shall he rack his aching brain, overbear his feeble, and almost wornout constitution for thy emolument-no more fatiguing labors, sleepless nights, mighty wrestlings in prayer for immortal souls, not only of his acquaintance and near akin, but strangers and savages through the land. He has rested, O blessed rest! from all these works; and what a glorious reward does follow them.

But is it cruel in me, my friends, to dwell on this mournful theme, and renew the grief of these deep mourners, and cause their wounds to bleed afresh, four months after the dear object of their sorrows is buried out of sight? We say, out of sight, out of mind. The Psalmist says, forgotten as a dead man-forgotten by the world. And Job says, the womb shall forget him, while the worm feeds sweetly upon him. The tender mother may, and unnaturally enough, forget the son of her womb, when dead, and become meat

All this

may

be true of vulgar dead;

for worms.

but oh! can Wheelock be forgotten? is it possible? shall not our sorrows bleed afresh at every remembrance of his name? And oh ! how are we surrounded with monitors and memorandums of his name and virtues. No, while the plains of Hanover, late the rough, and almost unpassable retreat of savage beasts of prey, thick set with lofty pines, which overtop the clouds, ow, ing chiefly, under God, to his arduous labor, and divine skill, lie smooth beneath our feet, and, drest with beauteous green, salute our eyes with a most beautiful prospect, while Dartmouth, or any of her sons remain alive; while Hanover or any one stone upon another remains of her buildings, not thrown down; while any vestage of Hanover, Dartmouth, or her extensive influence remains, so long shall the name and fame of our dear departed friend be remembered. I might then protract my mournful strain, without fear of offending-grief looses its nature, turns to joy, when vented on a proper'occasion. Proportion of things is beautiful to the rational mind-weeping pleasant, when there is great occasion for it; the effect proportionate to the cause.

Look away from me, I will

weep bitterly-labor not to comfort me, saith the prophet. My resolution is like his—’tis profitable too as well as pleasant. Such wounds, says Dr. Young, oftner heal too soon, than bleed too long."

Doctor Wheelock’s fidelity in the management of money, was never called in question by any acquainted with the business of the school. He was always careful to apply all monies for the particular purpose for which they were given. He considered every donation as a sacred deposit, and frequently called it the Lord's money, or Christ's money. The failure of that full success of his plans to evangelize the heathen, which

1

was from the first his most earnest desire, cannot be attributed to any want of fidelity or foresight in him. During the long and distressing revolutionary war, all attempts to carry his benevolent designs into execution, were necessarily relinquished. Though unforeseen events, in a great measure, disappointed the reasonable hopes, that the school would speedily prove an extensive benefit to the Indians; yet, by the overruling providence of God, it has already been made of considerable advantage to them, a great and rich blessing to others. From the time in which the school began to possess considerable property, during the life of the founder, he requested two or three respectable gentlemen, who were commonly appointed by the civil government to audit and examine every six months his accounts of receipts and expenditures in behalf of the School. They invariably found his accounts regularly stated, and accredited by proper vouch

Doctor Wheelock performed the duties of President of the College and School, Professor of Divinity, and Pastor of the church in the College. For all these abundant labors and cares he received no salary. His only compensation from his removal to Hanover till his decease, was a supply of provisions for his family. His erecting this School, and thus conducting it amidst various and great discouragements, are evidences of the benevolence, perseverance, and great abilities of its founder. He displayed a spirit like that of the pious and renowned Professor Augustus Franck of Saxony, who founded the celebrated Orphan House at Hall, which afterwards became a flourishing and useful Universiz ty. That an individual clergyman, without wealth or connexions with the rich or great,

ers.

settled in a small and obscure parish, in a country, where at that time few or none were rich, that he should by his own exertions raise an institution, which has commanded the notice and charities of all orders of men in Europe and America, from the menial servant to the powerful monarch on the throne, and finally found a flourishing University, laying a basis for endowments by which it has become extensively useful, and promises to be an eminent blessing to future generations, is an impressive example in the history of the world of what one man of persevering zeal may accomplish. Rather by this we see how God will assist and prosper those labors, which spring from a desire to promote his glory and the good of mankind. Although while pursuing with ardor the conversion of the Indians, he saw his School from a small beginning rise to distinguished importance, and saw a reputable University established under his fostering hand, he was not vainly elated with the success of his plans; but like the holy prophets, Joseph and Daniel in their remarkable prosperity, he ascribed all the glory to the goodness of God. He considered the College as an assistant to attain the first great object, which as it were absorbed his whole soul, the conversion of the heathen. Notwithstanding many discouragements, the good which he was instrumental of accomplishing for this purpose, was immensely great. Though a nation has not been born to God in a day, yet it is believed that many individual pagans have been everlastingly benefited by the labors of missionaries from his School. Among the six nations, who were the principal objects of his attention, some good fruits are discovered, even at the present day, in their attention to civil and religious institutions. (k)

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