Page images
PDF
EPUB

and they the benefit of being instructed therein, till they are of an age and understanding sufficient to set up for themselves, and introduce husbandry among their respective tribes. And that there be a moderate tax upon all the granted lands, after the first ten or fifteen years, and also some duty upon mills, &c. which shall not be burdensome to the inhabitants, for the support of the school, or missionaries among the Indians, &c. By this mean'much expence, and many

inconveniences oca casioned by our great distance from them, would be prevented, our missionaries be much better supported and provided for, especially in case of sickness, &c. Parents and children be more contented, being nearer to one another, and likely many persuaded to send their children for an education, who are now dissuaded from it, only on account of the great distance of the School from them. The bearer, Mr. Charles

S, is able, if your Excellency desires it, to give you a more full and particular account of the present state of this School, having been for some time the master and instructor of it, and is now designed with the leave of Providence, the ensuing summer, to make an excursion, as a missionary among the Indians, with an interpreter from this school. And by him your Excellency may fas vour me with your thoughts on what I have proposed.

I am with sincerest duty and esteem,

May it please your Excellency,

Your Excellency's most obedient

And most humble servant,

ELEAZAR WHEELOCK,

30

To the Hon. General Lyman.

Lebanon, April 9, 1763. May it please your Honor,

The narrative herewith enclosed will give you some account of the success of the feeble endeavors I have used in the affair therein related ; and you will see that if the number, in this school, continues to increase, as it has done, and as I think our prospects are, we shall soon have occasion to build, in or. der to accommodate them, and accordingly to determine upon the place where to fix it, most for the advantage of the great design we have in view. Several places have been proposed, viz. among the new settlements, in the western part of the Province of New Hampshire. And to encourage it, Gov. ernor Wentworth made me an offer of a tract of land, if I would carry

it there. There has also been some talk of the western part of the Province of Massachusetts Bay. But I have several objections against each of those places. And as your honor's character and influence at home and abroad; and

your thorough acquaintance with the state of the continent, and particularly with Indians and Indian affairs, enables you above any man I know in New England to serve and promote the design, so your moral character, and especially your benevolent disposition towards mankind, encourages and emboldens me with much confidence to solicit your friendship and assistance, by your consent and advice, upon this occasion. And I shall accordingly, relying upon your candor, expose myself and the affairs to you, in the most open manner, and submit to your consideration and censure the following proposal*. I have wrote General A

this head, and to the same purpose, and if your honor will please to let me know your mind in the affair, and advise me of any thing you shall think useful to me, I shall be greatly obliged to you.

upon

* See the preceding letter to General A

I bless God that he has preserved your valuable and important life, in your late dangerous expedition, and given your family and friends an opportunity and occasion to rejoice in your safe return. Please to accept most sincere esteem and respeet from, Sir, Your Honor's Most obedient, and

Most humble servant,

ELEAZAR WHEELOCK.

The Hon. General Lyman.

From the Hon. General Lyman.

Suffield, Connecticut, April 11, 1763. SIR,

I have to acknowledge the receipt of your letter by Mr. Sof the 9th instant, and am very much obliged to you for your generous sentiments of

me;
and assure you

I shall always be very glad to serve you personally, and much more, the generous design you have undertaken. I have not time to digest the subject, to give you my thoughts in particular, nor do I think you want them, who have so long turned your mind on that affair, and are so well able to judge of the matter; but I assure you

I am well pleased with the thoughts you suggest, and am in hopes they will issue well, when put in execution. I shall write more particular before I go home, and being in haste,

Your most obedient

[ocr errors]

And humble servant,

P. LYMAN.

Rev. Eleazar Wheelock.

To the Hon. General Lyman.

Lebanon, April 9, 1763. May it please your Honor,

The narrative herewith enclosed will give you some account of the success of the feeble endeavors I have used in the affair therein related ; and you will see that if the number, in this school, continues to increase, as it has done, and as I think our prospects are, we shall soon have occasion to build, in order to accommodate them, and accordingly to determine upon the place where to fix it, most for the advantage of the great design we bave in view. Several places have been proposed, viz. among the new settlements, in the western part of the Province of New Hampshire. And to encourage it, Gov. ernor Wentworth made me an offer of a tract of land, if I would carry it there. There has also been some talk of the western part of the Province of Massachusetts Bay. But I have several objections against each of those places. And as your honor's character and influence at home and abroad; and your thorough acquaintance with the state of the continent, and particularly with Indians and Indian affairs, enables you above any man I know in New England to serve and promote the design, so your moral character, and especially your benevolent disposition towards mankind, encourages and emboldens me with much confidence to solicit your friendship and assistance, by your consent and advice, upon this occasion. And I shall accordingly, relying upon your candor, expose myself and the affairs to you, in the most open manner, and submit to your consideration and censure the following proposal*. I have wrote General A

upon this head, and to the same purpose, and if your honor will please to let me know your mind in the affair, and advise me of any thing you shall think use. ful to me, I shall be greatly obliged to you.

* See the preceding letter to General A

I bless God that he has preserved your valuable and important life, in your late dangerous expedition, and given your family and friends an opportunity and occasion to rejoice in your safe return. Please to accept most sincere esteem and respect from, Sir, Your Honor's Most obedient, and Most humble servant,

ELEAZAR WHEELOCK. The Hon. General Lyman.

From the Hon. General Lyman.

Suffield, Connecticut, April 11, 1763. SIR,

I have to acknowledge the receipt of your letter by Mr. Sof the 9th instant, and am very much obliged to you for your generous sentiments of

me;
and assure you

I shall always be very glad to serve you personally, and much more, the generous design you have undertaken. I have not time to digest the subject, to give you my thoughts in particular, nor do I think you want them, who have so long turned your

mind on that affair, and are so well able to judge of the matter; but I assure you I am well pleased with the thoughts you suggest, and am in hopes they will issue well, when put in execution. I shall write more particular before I go home, and being in haste,

Your most obedient
And humble servant,

P. LYMAN
Rey, Eleazar Wheelock.

« PreviousContinue »