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also. Disease may oppress you--your faculties may

be

gone--- you may be suddenly called out of the world: all these are cases which daily happen.

Let these things, then, have their proper weight. Consider yourselves as labourers hired into your master's vineyard. Labour honestly through the day, and look in the evening for your reward. The evening will soon close in : whether you are rich, or whether you are poor, all will soon be reduced to one level. This world is not your home: it is a place only of fhort abode. Whatever your poffefsions are--your enjoyments, your amusements, your friends, your houses, and every thing your hearts have most been fet on, will all foon vanish.-What is to come in their room, it is your business to consider --it is an awful thought. It behoves you surely to make some provision for this great change ; and to fit yourselves for the enjoyment of other things, fince you are so soon to be difpoffefsed of these ; that when God calls you station here, you may not be wholly unqualified for a better station hereafter.

That

from your That we may all consider what is our real business, and true interest, in this world, and not put it off till too late an hour, may God Almighty of his infinite goodness grant, through Jesus Christ our Lord!

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SERMON XII.

GAL. vi. 7.

WHATSOEVER A MAN SOWETH, THAT SHALL

HE ALSO REAP: FOR HE THAT SOWETH TO

HIS FLESH, SHALL OF THE FLESH REAP COR-
RUPTION; BUT HE THAT SOWETH TO THE
SFIRIT, SHALL OF THE SPIRIT REAP LIFE

EVERLASTING.

THE
HE text may be thus in general explained :

In whatcver way a man lives, he shall be treated in the same way by God Almighty. If he lead a wicked life, he shall feel the mischief of it, and if he lead a pious one, he shall experience its advantages. And all this follows as naturally, as the grain you reap from the grain

fow. Wheat or barley will not more surely produce its kindred seed, than goodness will produce happiness, and wickedness misery. The

apostle

you fow.

apostle does not appear to confine the observation either to this world or the next; but seems to take them both together, declaring, in general, that a man's happiness, or misery, shall on the whole depend upon his conduct in this prez sent life.

Neither does the apostle mention the merits of Christ, as the ground of our salvation; taking it for granted, that this will easily be understood; and that he who soweth to the spirit can only, after his best endeavours, reap life everlasting through Jesus Christ,

Having thus explained the apostle's general meaning, I shall, in the fullowing discourse, first endeavour to prove the truth of it; and shall, secondly, add a few observations, which arise from it.

Now in many cases, even in this world, a man's reaping as he sows is so plain, that we cannot avoid feeing it. The virtue and the reward-the fin and the punishment, follow to closely upon each other, that the most careless observer cannot but acknowledge the connection. -Thus, when we observe a course of prudent actions crowned with success, it is easy to see the

effes effect following the cause. Or, when we see a man tuin his fortune at a gaming-table, we need nobody to point out the source of the mischief. But, in

cases, the good or the bad confequence is not so easily traced. It may be fome time before industry and frugality meet their deserved success; or the punishment may follow the offence so very flowly, that we may not discern the progress. When this is the case - when suffering does not immediately follow the transgreffion, men are apt to run blindly on, without considering consequences. Thus the man, who would not directly destroy himself by drinking poison, will without scruple indulge in continued acts of intemperance; notwithstanding this vice will as generally bring on his ruin in the end, as if he had destroyed himself at once by poison. The only difference is, that in one case the mifchief works immediately; in the other, by degrees. But though a variety of circumstances may for a while keep off the evil or the good, yet they are still advancing with a steady pace, though perhaps too flow for common observation. Thus, for instance, a man may sometimes live imprudently: he may never look into his affairs, nor compare his expençes with his in

many

cone;

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