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LIVY

BOOK I

BY

JOHN K. LORD, PhD.
PROFESSOR OF LATIN IN DARTMOUTH COLLEGE

ου πόλλ' αλλά πολύ

BENJ. H. SANBORN & CO.

BOSTON, U.S.A.

Harvard University,
Dont of Education Library

HARVARD
UNIVERSITY
LIBRARY
TEB o 1.54

COPYRIGHT, 1896,

BY JOHN K. LORD.

Norwood Press
J. S. Cushing & Co. - Berwick & Smith

Norwood Mass. U.S.A.

SUMMARY

PREFACE

Livy is uncertain of success in writing a history of Rome, because so many have attempted the task, $$ 1-3, and because the subject is so great, and because the story of early times is not interesting to many readers, $$ 4, 5. The poetic and legendary character of early Roman history, uniting divine and human affairs, is justified by the greatness of Rome, SS 6, 7. History is valuable for instruction for the present, $$ 8–10, and Roman history is especially valuable, $$ 11-13.

BOOK I

The scattering of the Trojans on the downfall of Troy, and the coming of those under Aeneas into Italy, chs. 1, 2. The founding of Alba, ch. 3. Birth of Romulus and Remus, ch. 4. Overthrow of Amulius, ch. 5. Romulus and Remus wish to found a city, and take the omens for it, ch. 6. Death of Remus; establishment of religious rituals; story of Hercules, Cacus, and Evander, ch. 7. Political institutions of Romulus; the asylum, ch. 8. Games established to attract the neighbors of Rome; rape of the Sabine women; resulting wars and union of the Romans and the Sabines, chs. 9–13.

Death of Tatius and war with Fidenae, ch. 14. War and treaty with Veii, ch. 15. Death and deification of Romulus, ch. 16. Interregnum and party spirit, ch. 17.

Election of Numa, ch. 18. Civil and religious institutions of Numa; the temple of Janus; the arrangement of the calendar; appointment of flamens, Vestal virgins, and various priesthoods; Numa's intercourse with Egeria, chs. 19–21. Accession of Tullus Hostilius; war with Alba, chs. 22, 23. Story of the Curiatii and Horatii, and triumph of the Romans, chs. 24, 25. Horatius kills his sister and is acquitted by the people, ch. 26. War with Fidenae and treachery of Mettius, the Alban king; his punishment and the destruction of Alba, chs. 27–29. War with the Sabines, ch. 30. Prodigies, pestilence, death of Tullus, ch. 31.

Interregnum; choice of Ancus Martius; the fetials, ch. 32. Wars of Ancus with the Latins; construction of a prison, ch. 33. Coming of Tarquinius Priscus and Tanaquil to Rome, ch. 34. Death of Ancus and choice of Tarquinius; his political measures, ch. 35. Story of Attus Navius, and the enlargement of the centuries, ch. 36. Victories of the Sabines, ch. 37. Formula of surrender; war with Latins; constructions in Rome, ch. 38.

Birth of Servius Tullius, ch. 39. Death of Tarquin, ch. 40. Rise of Servius Tullius, and assumption of royalty, chs. 41, 42. Establishment of the comitia centuriata, ch. 43. Growth of the city, and union of Rome and Latium, chs. 44, 45. Ambition of young Tarquin; his marriage with Tullia, chs. 46, 47. They conspire against Servius, who is killed, and Tullia drives over his dead body, ch. 48.

Reign of Tarquinius Superbus; his league with the Latins, ch. 49. Their discontent, expressed by Turnus, chs. 50, 51, who is killed by Tarquinius, ch. 52. War with the Volsci, ch. 53. Sends his son to Gabii, who gains control in the city and surrenders it to his father, ch. 54. Laying of foundations for the temple of Jupiter on the Capitoline, ch. 55. Building of the cloaca maxima; prodigy of a serpent and the .embassy to Delphi, ch. 56. The story of Lucretia, chs. 57, 58. Brutus appears in his real character, and heads an insurrection against Tarquinius, who is forced to go from Rome into exile, chs. 59, 60.

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