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the historic development of all phases of our fabric industries. It is highly pedagogical, thoroughly practical, well illustrated and beautifully printed and bound. Valuable and helpful questions accompany each chapter. It has been prepared with great care for the benefit of teachers who need ready facts and materials concerning our fabric industries for schoolroom use.

Heroes of the Nation.

Robert E. Lee and the Southern Confederacy, by Henry Alexander White, Ph.D. D.D., Professor of History in the Washington and Lee University. G. P. Putnam's Sons, New York. 1897. Cloth, extra $1.50. Half-leather, uncut edges, gilt top $1.75.

In the series, embracing, among others, Julius Cæsar, Nelson, Napoleon, Hannibal, Grant and Lincoln, the history of Robert E. Lee appears, and is a valuable contribution to the literature of the day. This book will be read with absorbing interest by all classes who recognize the high character of this great man.

New Songs For Schools.

J. Fischer & Bro., 7 Bible House, N. Y., have sent us the following new songs:

1. The Tinker's Song. (For boys.) J. Wiegand. Price, 40

cents.

2. The Chinese Umbrella. (For girls.) drill. C. H. Lewis. Price, 50 cents.

Chorus with umbrella

Price, 40 cents.

3. The Crafty Old Spider. J. Wiegand. They will prove very interesting to persons who are getting up entertainments at schools or social gatherings. Numbers 1 and 2 are beautiful and attractive action songs, and number 3 contains a good moral lesson for young and old. The music is very tuneful and catchy, while the accompaniments are written in an easy and graceful style.

D. C. Heath & Company, publishers, Boston, have in press for immediate issue in Heath's Modern Language Series, German Selections for Sight Translation, selected and edited by Mme. G. F. Mondan of the High School, Bridgeport, Conn. These consist of fifty or sixty pages of fifteen-line extracts, designed for weekly written exercises in German translation at sight, or for oral translation, or for examination purposes, or to be used in any other way that may be desired. The little text is a companion to the "French Selections for Sight Translation," by Miss Bruce, published by the same house and already very extensively used in schools.

The University Publishing Company, New York, have in preparation, Cooper's "The Water Witch," Scott's "Tales of a Grandfather," Cooper's "Last of the Mohicans," and George Eliot's "Silas Marner." "Poems of Knightly Adventure," just ready, contains four complete poems, with notes by Prof. E. E. Hale, Jr., Ph. D., viz. : Tennyson's "Gareth and Lynette," Matthew Arnold's "Sohrab and Rustrum," Macaulay's "Horatius" and Lowell's "Vision of Sir Launfal.” One of the most notable publications issued from the book press in recent years is Webster's International Dictionary.

As a lexicon of the English language it is without an equal. The definitions are sufficiently full without being too lengthy, its guides in pronunciation are really helpful and practical, and the work is thoroughly serviceable in every respect.

Webster's dictionaries have long been the standard English lexicons, and the International is most worthy to bear the name. The work is a marvel of the printer's art; it is beautiful, attractive and serviceable. Messrs. G. and C. Merriam & Co., of Springfield, Mass., the publishers, are to be congratulated upon their success in the preparation of the International, and upon its cordial reception by the public.

Exhaustion

Horsford's Acid Phosphate

Overworked men and women, the nervous, weak and debilitated, will find in the Acid Phosphate a most agreeable, grateful and harmless stimulant, giving renewed strength and vigor to the entire system.

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"I have used it in my own case when suffering from nervous exhaustion, with gratifying results. I have prescribed it for many of the various forms

GEO. W. HARRISON, Manager

(State Printer), Atlanta, Ga. -Consult them before placing your orders.

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of nervous debility, and it has never Medical College and Hospital,

failed to do good.

Descriptive pamphlet free on application to Rumford Chemical Works, Providence, R. 1. Beware of Substitutes and Imitations.

For sale by all Druggists.

OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS.

The Thirty-eighth annual course of lectures in this institution will commence September 14, 1897. New college building, elevators, restaurant, reading rooms and laboratories. Everything modern. Experienced teachers. Equality in sex. For Lecture Card and 2811 Cottage Grove Ave., Chicago. Announcement address J. R. COBB, M. D.,

VOL. 11.

ATLANTA, GA., JANUARY, 1898.

PUBLISHED IN THE INTEREST OF EDUCATION IN THE SOUTH,

No. 3.

AT THE OFFICE OF THE FRANKLIN PRINTING & PUBLISHING CO., GEO. W. HARRISON, MANAGER. 65-71 Ivy Street, Atlanta, Georgia.

PROF. G. R. GLENN (STATE SCHOOL COMMISSIONER FOR GEORGIA), EDITOR.

E. S. HARRISON, ASSOCIATE EDITOR.

SUBSCRIPTION PRICE, ONE DOLLAR PER ANNUM, IN ADVANCE. TRIAL SUBSCRIPTION FOUR MONTHS FOR 25C. IN STAMPS. To Clubs of Five, $4.00. To Clubs of Ten, $7.50.

ADVERTISING RATES, $1.50 PER INCH. Advertisements should be in hand by the 5th to insure their insertion in next issue.

HOW TO SUBSCRIBE.-You can subscribe through your County Superintendent, who will make you a receipt for any money paid him. If the money is not convenient, we will send paper, payable next pay day, if you will give us an accepted order on your County Superintendent for not less than a year's subscription.

We issue monthly, on the 10th of each month in the year. Any one failing to get his paper within five days after the date of issue will confer a favor by notifying us, when another paper will be sent. Failure to do so relieves us of all responsibility in the matter.

Your name will be continued on our books when your subscription expires unless you notify us to discontinue the Journal.

Address all communications, and make all remittances to

THE SOUTHERN EDUCATIONAL JOURNAL, Box 415, Atlanta, Ga.

Entered at the Post-office at Atlanta, Ga., as second-class matter.

The Library Commission Bill.

A bill most important to the educational interests of Georgia was that passed by the last General Assembly known as the Library Commission Bill. In reference to this bill we have received the following communication :

To the Editor of the Educational Journal.

Dear Sir: Since the meeting of the "Georgia Library Association" at Macon, October 28th and 29th, the General Assembly of Georgia has passed the Library Commission bill and I thought it might be of interest to your readers to know the history of the bill.

In October, 1896, the directors of the Young Men's Library of Atlanta, seeing the need of a State head in library work, appointed a committee, of which Mr. F. J. Paxon was chairman, to draft a bill creating a Library Commission for Georgia. This bill was introduced

by Mr. Clarence Knowles, of Fulton county, and his intelligent, active attention to the matter deserves the highest praise, from not only the librarians of the State, but every one who is interested in the educational growth of Georgia.

The bill provides for the appointment of five commissioners, whose duty it will be to aid in the organization of new libraries, the collection of statistics, counsel in administrative and literary details, and the general welfare of the library interests of the State.

Very respectfully,

ANNE WALLACE,

President Georgia Library Association.

Young Men's Library, Atlanta, Ga., Dec. 29, 1897.

First Textile School in the South.

"Just before its final adjourment December 17, the Georgia Senate passed the house bill providing for the establishment of a textile school as a branch of the State School of Technology in Atlanta. The bill appropriates only $10,000, and provides that a like sum must be raised for the school before the appropriation is available. The friends of the movement say that more than the requisite amount on the outside is already in sight, and believe that the next legislature will increase the appropriation for the school, which will be the first institution of its kind in the South.

Trans-Mississippi Teachers' Convention.

The suggestion of a convention of school teachers in conjunction with the Educational Congress now being arranged as one of the leading features of interest at the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition at Omaha in 1898, is meeting with universal favor on the part of influential educators, State superintendents, school boards and teachers of grades and district schools in many of the western and southern States. It is believed that such a convention will afford to thousands of teachers who may not attend the meeting of the National Educational Association in Washington an opportunity to derive from the meeting at Omaha the benefits they cannot otherwise enjoy, while permitting them to combine pleasure with knowledge in visiting the exposition of 1898.

The Bureau of Education of the Trans-Mississippi Exposition has taken hold of the matter of organizing the educational congress to be held in Omaha during the exposition at some date yet to be arranged. The governing idea is that the date shall not conflict with that fixed for the meeting of the National Educational Association. According to the plan of organization first adopted by the Board of Woman Managers they will have charge of the educational, religious, philosophical and scientific congresses, that will assemble during the exposition. The general plans of the programs proposed for the Trans-Mississippi Teachers' Convention will be somewhat similar to those followed by the National Educational Association, and the meetings will be addressed by the best educational speakers. Section meetings are included for the purpose of pursuing particular lines of educational work, and these will be addressed by experts in that particular line.

The latter part of June has been suggested as a satisfactory date for the congress and arrangements are already on foot for the entertainment of visitors and securing of low railroad rates.

National Educational Association.

The Executive Committee has already announced, through the Educational Press, the selection of Washington, D. C., as the place for the annual meeting of the National Educational Association in July, 1898. The time will be from Thursday, July 7th, to Tuesday, July 12th, inclusive. It is expected that the National Council will meet during the two days before the opening of the general association.

Already the Trunk Line and Central Passenger Associations have granted one fare for the round trip, plus two dollars membership fee, with extension until August 31st. This action awaits the approval of the Board of General Managers, which will doubtless be secured at an early date. Without doubt, connecting Associations will take concurrent action.

The correspondence with the Local Committee and its various subcommittees should be addressed to President B. L. Whitman, Chairman Local Executive Committee, Columbian University, Washington, D. C.

Arrangements have already been made for dividing the large au

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