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But especially the JOURNAL feels that it is to be congratulated on the talent it has secured for its book reviews. Works on education will be reviewed by progressive practical teachers who know the need of the hour, while for books of a purely literary character we have obtained the services of a critic who is a lover of the best in literature, gifted, moreover, with rare literary acumen and an appreciative insight and sympathy.

We feel, then, that we are justified in promising our readers that they may look to the JOURNAL book reviews as a real help and guide to them in their book-buying, both when they are wanting the books of their profession or those other kinds of books that Mr. Hamilton W. Mabie calls "the books of life and culture."

"The Columbia Automatic"

Represents the
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ne Piqua School Furniture Co.,

PIQUA, O

MESERVEY'S TEXT BOOKS IN BOOK-KEEPING

Are used in public schools in every State in the Union. By legal adoption in -cities and towns aggregating more than 11,000 000 population; in 60 of the 124 cities having, by the last census, over 25,000 population. They seem to meet the requirements of High and Grammar Schools in an entirely satisfactory manner.

Sample sent for examination. Single and double entry, 50 cents. Single entry 30 cents. Send for descriptive circulars.

THOMPSON, BROWN & CO., Publishers, Boston and Chicago.

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Who waits until circumstances

Attempt the end, and never stand to doubt; completely favor his undertaking

Nothing's so hard but search will find it out.
-Robert Herrick.

Indigestion

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will never accomplish anything.— Luther.

Pleasure comes through toil, and not by self-indulgence and indolence. When one gets to lovework, his life is a happy one.Ruskin.

The Atlanta Business College,

Whitehall St, Atlanta, Ga.

Write us at once, if you wish to take a Busi ness or Shorthand course, and you will receive

Is the most effective and agree-by return mall the mos; interesting paper pub

able remedy in existence for preventing indigestion, and relieving those diseases arising from a disordered stomach.

D. W. W. Gardner, Springfield, Mass., says: "I value it as an excellent preventive of indigestion, and a pleasant acidulated drink when properly diluted with water, and sweetened."

Descriptive pamphlet free on application to Rumford Chemical Works, Providence, R. I. Beware of Substitutes and Imitations.

For sale by all Druggists.

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HOW WILL YOU TRADE?

Trade what? Trade work for money; we want men and women everywhere to sell our Non-alcoholic Flavoring Powders for cakes, candies, ices, etc. They are perfectly pure and twice as strong s liquid extracts. We pay $3 25 a day and give steady work; if you can't get more than that write to us at once and we will start you to work. Address, the U. S. FRUIT CO., St. Louis, Mo.

TEACHERS WANTED.

Positions Secured for Summer and Fall Schools..
Write for Particulars.

vacancies in 17 States. Oper. The National Teachers' Ass'n,

rate in every State.

Robertson's Teachers' Agency. *HN. ROBERTSON, Prop, P.O. Box 203, Memphis, Tenn.

GEO. WESLEY SMITH, Manager,
ATLANTA, GA.

The Southern Educational Journal.

VOL. 11.

ATLANTA, GA., MARCH, 1898.

PUBLISHED IN THE INTEREST OF EDUCATION IN THE SOUTH,

No. 5.

AT THE OFFICE OF THE FRANKLIN PRINTING & PUBLISHING CO., GEO. W. HARRISON, MANAGER. 65-71 Ivy Street, Atlanta, Georgia.

PROF. G. R. GLENN (STATE SCHOOL COMMISSIONER FOR GEORGIA), EDITOR.

E. S. HARRISON, ASSOCIATE EDITOR.

SUBSCRIPTION PRICE, ONE DOLLAR PER ANNUM, IN ADVANCE. TRIAL SUBSCRIPTION FOUR MONTHS FOR 25C. IN STAMPS. To Clubs of Five, $4.00. To Clubs of Ten, $7.50.

ADVERTISING RATES, $1.50 PER INCH. insure their insertion in next issue.

Advertisements should be in hand by the 5th to

HOW TO SUBSCRIBE.-You can subscribe through your County Superintendent, who will make you a receipt for any money paid him.

If the money is not convenient, we will send paper, payable next pay day, if you will give us an accepted order on your County Superintendent for not less than a year's subscription.

We issue monthly, on the 10th of each month in the year. Any one failing to get his paper within five days after the date of issue will confer a favor by notifying us, when another paper will be sent. Failure to do so relieves us of all responsibility in the matter.

Your name will be continued on our books when your subscription expires unless you notify us to discontinue the Journal.

Address all communications, and make all remittances to

THE SOUTHERN EDUCATIONAL JOURNAL, Box 415, Atlanta, Ga.

Entered at the Post-office at Atlanta, Ga., as second-class matter.

Georgia's Educational Needs.

EXTRACT FROM AN ADDRESS DELIVERED BEFORE "THE ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB" BY SUPT J. C. WOODWARD, NEWNAN, GA.

Discussing Georgia's common school system, the speaker said; "The course of study is strictly elementary and fails to provide any high school, or secondary, training. This fact is very significant, since it shows an absolute lack of sympathetic appreciation of the great and crying need of our people. The statement may seem dogmatic, but it is unalterably true. Being an agricultural people, we shall never develop the rich possibilities of our natural resources until we have a secondary education that shall make biology, agricultural chemistry, practical surveying, manual training and the domestic and industrial arts a very prominent feature of the curriculum, and this education must be so ordered

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that our rural as well as urban children may be able to take advantage of it.

* * *

Having traced the State's educational history, Mr. Woodward. said:

"This review of the State's history in education shows these facts:

1. Our people have never been reticent in matters of public education.

2. The demand of our people is for common, or public, schools, and education for all classes.

3. Notwithstanding strong opposition from some sources, the public school system is here to stay and grow until it satisfies our educational needs.

4. The public school system in Georgia to-day has serious weaknesses and must undergo reforms. In the interest of the rising generation these should be rapidly made.

* * *

SCHOOL FUNDS.-So far as the rural schools are concerned, Georgia relies, with few exceptions, upon a State fund, and will have next year six and a half school months. Three lasting defects are here seen: First, the school term is still too short. Second, the school fund is too small. Third, the fund being wholly by the State, the great stimulus to local interests and support is removed. Under our system of institutions, the people must feel an abiding interest in, and be vitally connected with, their institutions to give them closest, strongest and heartiest support. This can be done. only by making their participation in the State fund depend upon a reasonable school tax. Where the treasure is there will the heart be also." * * *

BUILDINGS. The average Georgia schoolhouse is a disgrace to our· proud civilization and the fair name of our mother State. Our counties must be laid off into school districts, and modern school buildings erected in each. Two races occupying the same territory and always to be kept separate in school, sparseness of population, etc., hinder these steps, but they must be taken.

TEACHERS AND SUPERVISION. A fossil is destitute of life and incapable of resuscitation. We have some fossilized teachers and are making more. Our normal schools may turn out competent and meritorious teachers this year, but the rapid advancement of educational thought makes a teacher's usefulness dependent upon professional merit and deeper philosophical insight. Teachers who do a fixed grade of work easily become statie. Examinations will not remove the defects. Herein lies the solution of this vital problem: The teacher must be kept at school in the higher

and more liberal meaning of this term. Each county should have as superintendent of education not a lawyer, a doctor, a preacher, but the most thoroughly trained pedagogue available, who should have power to bring together his teachers for study and professional research once or twice every month, put them upon a well planned course of reading, and spend not less than two weeks in institute work each summer. Boards of education should supply their teachers with a professional library and the best philosophical literature. Our rural schools should be open eight months a

year.

* * *

ATTENDACE. We are not ready to solve this question in Geor-gia; but the logical answer is compulsory education.

* * *

COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL.-Many oppose our public school education and object to any extension of its benefits. If public education is justifiable at all, it should not end until the child is trained for intelligent and useful citizenship, which means we cannot cease training the child below the high school.

* * *

The future finishing school of our people will be the high school, which must be organized to reach our country as well as town children. Towns and cities are looking after this training, but the rural children are left to perish educationally or "move to town." This "moving to town" has already cost our State millions by taking from our farms the intelligence of the country. * * * The towns must reach down to help the country, and the country must reach up to join the towns in establishing the county as the educational unit, with one superintendent, one system of schools, and this system ending in our central high school which shall offer in its curriculum those things that will enable our boys and girls to work out our social, domestic and industrial problems and develop the great possibilities of our agricultural, mining and manufacturing resources. The curriculum must be elective and offer manual training, biology, agricultural chemistry, practical surveying and terracing, mechanical and free-hand drawing, cooking, dressmaking, bookkeeping and the domestic and sanitary arts. Greek and Latin should not be displaced but made elective. * * *. In connection with this high school should be a commodious dormitory for boys and one for girls, where the cost of living may be reduced to the remarkably low sum of $5 to $8 per month, almost all of which the rural home could pay in dairy and farm products. Our people are too poor to pay more, and their only hope is to bring education within their financial reach. Think of the splendid prospect when we shall see the youth of our country thus educated and returning to our farms to unlock the wealth of our soils, to disclose the hidden treasures of our mountains, to turn our

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