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times blind; if a servant, sometimes deaf.-Fuller.

Those who want friends to open themselves unto are cannibals unto their own hearts.-Bacon.

MIND CULTURE,
SUMMER THINKING.

Send 2 cent stamp for 14 Wherewithal Coupons,
and 11 Reviews to the

WHEREWITHAL BOOK CO.
Phila Bourse, Philadelphia, Pa.
A book incident unparalleled and School also.

MEDICAL COLLEGE and HOSPITAL

OF CHICACO.

The Largest and Best Equipped
Medical College in the World.

The Thirty-Ninth Annual Session opens September 14, 1898. The College curriculum embraces the following features.

1. A Four Years' Graded Collegiate Course.

2. Hospital and Dispensary Clinical instruction by the College Staff.

3. Fourteen General Clinics and Sixty Sub-Clinics each and every week of the Season.

4. During the Year Ending April 1, 1897, there were Treated in the Hospital and Dispensary by our own staff, 29,854 cases.

5. Actual Laboratory Instruction in Thoroughly Equipped Laboratories. For Announcement and Sample Copy of Clinique, address the Registrar, JO EPH P. CUBB, M. D.. C. H VILAS, M. D., Dean, 2811-13 Cottage Grove Ave., Chicago

TEACHERS WANTED! UNION TEACHERS' ACENCIES OF AMERICA.

Rev. L. D. BASS, D.D.. Manager.

Pittsburg, Pa., Toronto, Can., New Orleans, La., New York, N. Y., Washington, D. C., San Francisco, Cal., Chicago, Ill., St. Louis, Mo, and Denver, Colorado.

There are thousands of positions to be filled soon. We had over 8,000 vacancies during the past season. Unqualified facilities for placing teachers in every part of the U. S. and Canada, as over 95 per cent. of those who registered before August secured positions. One tee registers in 9 offices. Add as atÎ applications to Saltsburg, Pa.

A Good Way to Spend the Summer

is to take a Special Normal Course for Teachers and Others.

AMERICAN COLLEGE

OFFERS COURSES IN

Dramatic Art. Oratory, Elocution, Delsarte, Physical Culture Acting, Piano,
Violin, Mandolin, Guitar, Vocal Music and Dancing, Teachers
Course, and also Telegraphy, Shorthand, Etc.

WRITE FOR PARTICULARS.

Increase your chances for earning money and cultivate your talent by attending the American College. Diplomas granted for work done. Chicago, on account of the lake breezes, has the finest summer climate in the world. Tuition very moderate and board as reasonable in Chicago as in the country.

The American College is located on the third floor of the Great Northern Building, eighteen stories high, finished in marble and mahogany, located in the heart of the city. The American College is the largest in the world, and this year offers special inducements to students from out of town. Address

AMERICAN COLLEGE, Third Floor Great Northern Theatre Building, 77 Jackson Boulevard.

AGENTS WANTED.-Free samples. Several teachers earn large commissions. BRATTICE, 243 Pearl, New York.

CABLE PIANO CO.,

H. B. MORENUS, Manager.

80 WHITEHALL ST., Atlanta, Ga.

Headquarters for High Grade Pianos and Organs. Wholesale & Retail Publishers and Jobbers of Sheet Music.

The Strongest Music House in the South.

The Southern Educational Journal.

VOL. 11.

ATLANTA, GA., SEPTEMBER, 1898.

PUBLISHED IN THE INTEREST OF EDUCATION IN THE SOUTH,

No. 11.

AT THE OFFICE OF THE FRANKLIN PRINTING & PUBLISHING CO., GEO. W. HARRISON, MANAGER. 65-71 Ivy Street, Atlanta, Georgia.

PROF. G. R. GLENN (STATE SCHOOL COMMISSIONER FOR GEORGIA), EDITOR.

E. S. HARRISON, ASSOCIATE EDITOR.

SUBSCRIPTION PRICE, ONE DOLLAR PER ANNUM, IN ADVANCE. TRIAL SUBSCRIPTION FOUR MONTHS FOR 25C. IN STAMPS. To Clubs of Five, $4.00. To Clubs of Ten, $7.50.

ADVERTISING RATES, $1.50 PER INCH. insure their insertion in next issue.

Advertisements should be in hand by the 5th to

HOW TO SUBSCRIBE.-You can subscribe through your County Superintendent, who will make you a receipt for any money paid him. If the money is not convenient, we will send paper, payable next pay day, if you will give us an accepted order on your County Superintendent for not less than a year's subscription.

We issue monthly, on the 10th of each month in the year. Any one failing to get his paper within five days after the date of issue will confer a favor by notifying us, when another paper will be sent. Failure to do so relieves us of all responsibility in the matter.

Your name will be continued on our books when your subscription expires unless you notify us to discontinue the Journal.

Address all communications, and make all remittances to

THE SOUTHERN EDUCATIONAL JOURNAL, Box 415, Atlanta, Ga.

Entered at the Post-office at Atlanta, Ga., as second-class matter.

What the State Commissioner of Education Has to Say in His Report to the Legislature on Industrial Education.

In my judgment the time has come to add new features to our system of public education in Georgia. With in the last ten years in many countries of the world radical changes have been made in the methods and purposes of public education. The most radical of these changes has been the introduction of some form or other of manual or industrial training. In Switzerland, Germany, Austria, France, and elsewhere in the old world, as well as in nearly all of the leading States of this country, there has been embodied a course

of instruction, the purpose of which is to train the child's hand, or rather to develop its mental powers through the use of its hand.

Modern psychologists, who have given a great deal of study to the development of the brain, have reached the conclusion that a large part of the brain can only be developed by the training that comes through the hand. The old system of education employed, for the development of the brain, the sense of sight and the sense of hearing. The modern system of education demands that the sense of touch, of which the hand is the chief organ, shall be added. In other words the theory of the modern psychologist is that the three principal areas of the brain are developed by the use of the hearing, the sight and the touch, and that the child cannot be naturally and normally developed unless all three of these organs are employed together. If this be true, and all the world has come to accept it as being true, then it seems that there should be added to our course of study whatever may be found necessary to develop the brain through the hand as well as through the eye and the ear.

It is a matter of common experience that a great many children that have gone through our grammar schools, and our high schools even, have found themselves in a condition of helplessness at the end of their course of study. I do not know any more pitiable condition in which a young life can be placed than that of the graduates of our schools who awake to a realization that after all their training and education, their appeals for situations are answered by the stereotyped phrase "Not wanted." There must be something radically wrong in our system when so many thousands of our young people come out of our schools and have to be branded on their graduation day "not wanted.", The question is, why are our children marked "not wanted" after they have gone through our schools? The trouble must be in the character of the school-work and in the kind of preparation that has failed to supply to the children the proper equipment for the work they are expected to do. The simple truth is that our present system of public education in Georgia tends to lead our children to seek employment other than manual labor. The radical defect in our system is that it educates our boys and our girls to desire a way of escaping manual labor when there ought to be

embodied in the system a training that will prepare the children to engage in some form or other of hard manual toil.

For the next fifty years in Georgia the man who will be wanted is the man who can make the most intelligent use of his hands along with his eyes and his ears. The skilled manual labor that will have to be applied in the development of our industrial resources ought to be trained here at home. We should not be driven to the necessity of importing the kind of labor that Georgia will want on her farms, in her manufactories, in her foundries, in her machine shops and elsewhere. The potential citizen of the future will be the citizen whose hands have been trained to do things that the world wants done and that the world is willing to pay for. This training so necessary to our present situation must be provided for our children here at home and while they are at school. It is necessary therefore to change the ideal that has grown out of our present system. Instead of training our children to escape labor with their hands, we want to train our children so that every one of them will be potential for usefulness by reason of the fact that the public school has given to every child an intelligent skill that will enable it to find its place as soon as it is free from school. That is a glad hour in the career of every young life when it awakes to the consciousness that it is ready to do some service that the world is waiting for and for which service ready and adequate compensation is also waiting.

I would not abate one jot or one tittle of the academic training that we are giving our children; but the point that I desire to press home upon the Legislature is this, that our present system of education is turning loose upon the State too many young people who neither desire to do the kind of work that they can find to do, nor are they prepared to do this work. The thought that has been steadily instilled into the minds of our children has been that if they can get. an education they can escape hard manual toil. The thought that we want to put into the minds of our children is that they need a kind of education that will enable them to do intelligently and pleasantly and profitably the hardest kind of manual labor.

I need not urge further upon the legislature the necessity for insisting upon industrial education for our children at the present

moment. Every member of this body knows that the future of Georgia depends largely upon the character of the industrial development that be carried on in the State for years to come.

may

We have been for the most part an agricultural people. One of the products of our agriculture is a staple that is wanted all over the world. Georgia produces more cotton than any other State in the Union except Texas. Nearly all of our raw cotton has been shipped out of the State to be worked into manufactured product elsewhere. It is a well-known principle in political economy that those who simply produce raw material, and ship that raw material elsewhere, will always be more or less dependent upon the manufacturers of the raw material. The manufacturer can easily put his business into a trust, especially when he is so far removed from the producers of the raw material, and he can fix the price both of the raw material and the manufactured product. It has been fouud practically impossible for those who produce the raw material either to form a trust or to limit the amount of production, so that the producer of raw material in Georgia has been at the mercy of the manufacturer of this raw material in Massachusetts.

This further is true, and is beginning to be felt in Georgia: Hereafter the raw material must be converted into manufactured product in the field where it is produced. A tremendous saving of freight charges and commissions and other incidental expenses is thus secured, and this saving goes largely to the producer of the raw material. Every day makes it more and more manifest that Georgia must work into manufactured product here at home every bale of cotton that she produces. If we are destined in our day and generation to reach the highest stage of prosperity to which our resources entitle us, we must prepare our own children to work up our own raw material here at home. We have not only our cotton fiber, but we have our hard woods and our ores and a thousand sources of wealth that will give endless variety to our labor, if we will only train our children in the schools to apply their energies to this form of industry. The German maxim is recognized the world over as containing the truth on this subject: Whatever changes are to be made in the life of a nation or people must be introduced into the lives of the children at school.

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