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TO

JOHN LOWTHER, Esq.

OF SWILLINGTON,

REPRESENTATIVE IN PARLIAMENT

FOR THE COUNTY OF

CUMBERLAND,

AS A TRIBUTE OF GRATITUDE DUE

NOT MORE

FOR THE VALUE OF HIS COMMUNICATIONS,

THAN FOR THE COURTESY

WITH WHICH THEY WERE ACCOMPANIED,

THIS EDITION

OF THE COLLECTIVE WORKS

OF HIS EXCELLENT AND VENERABLE RELATIVE

IS,

WITH THE UTMOST RESPECT,

INSCRIBED

BY HIS OBLIGED AND OBEDIENT SERVANT,

FRANCIS WRANGHAM.

Hunmanby, Feb. 28, 1820.

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The subjoined collection, in addition to the various productions published by the late Dr. Zouch, or printed for a limited private circulation, contains several pieces left by him in manuscript, which he had obviously intended, and in some instances nearly prepared, for the press. With respect to the first class, the impressions were in general unusually small, and of those, the number remaining unsold after a certain interval had been regularly withdrawn from the booksellers; so that copies of them are at present seldom to be found, out of the hands of his surviving friends or of their representatives. Hence it was concluded, that they would form an acceptable combination with the new matter. From this list, however, must be excepted his · Walton's Lives' (of which a third edition has recently made it's appearance, with that Author's 'Love and Truth' appended) and his Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Sir Philip Sidney.'

Of the two unpublished tracts (“ the Life and Character of John Lord Viscount Lonsdale,' and the 'Memoir of the Life of Dean Sudbury') of which a few copies had been printed for the gratification of private friendship, the first was compiled in conjunction with his nephew, the present Earl of Lonsdale, who drew up a great part of it, and is now with that nobleman's concurrence given to the world. Worthy of such biographers was he, who in conformity to his own maxim, * when no hopes remained of a change of behaviour in James II. and his Council, from his fears of the united efforts of popery and tyranny joined with other great and good men in soliciting the assistance of William Prince of Orange, and became a member of the Convention summoned at that critical period. The subject of the latter work was, for his judicious beneficence, thought not unworthy of being celebrated in Greek verse. Attached to Joshua Barnes' Aulico-Catoptron, sive Estherce Historia, is an Eυχαριςηριον, ειτ' εν Των της εμης Εσθηρος φιλων Καταλογος και Μνημοσυνον, in which he includes

* “ He, who builds his greatness and his fortune hy flattering and serving a Prince in his vices or designs of tyranny, is a traitor to God, to his Prince, and to his Country, and ought to be treated as such.” Such was the language of those, to whose virtuous exertions we owe the establishing of the House of Brunswick upon the throne of Great Britain.

Συδξυριον τε μεγαν τον Δανελμπα Δεκανον,
Συδβυριον βασιλευσιν εoικoτα δωρα διδονία, ,
Συδβυριον κλυτον ονομαει φιλον Εμμανιηλι"
Εμμανιηληων Βακαλαυρων ος παναρις
Αργυρεον κατ' ετος (κεντρον γλυκυ) δωκε κυπελλον.
Ως οφελαμβροσιην τε φαγειν τωνδ' εινεκα δωρων,
Ηδε πιειν γλυκυ νεκταρ απ'

αργυρεοιο κυπελλο. . Dr. Sudbury however, as well as Sir George Wheler, appeare to have been selected by Dr. Zouch as a subject of biography, on account of his connexion with the Church of Durham.

For several corrections of this Memoir, furnished through the hands of Mr. Ingram with the most obliging kindness by Sir Cuthbert Sharp, who has lately had occasion to examine several of the MSS. of the Episcopal Library of that city, I beg leave

* Pp. 169, 170. The above quotation I owe to another still more learned Grecian,

-κλυτον ενoμ' αει φιλον Εμμανιηλι.

Of this Society, to which Drs. Sudbury, Barnes, and Parr have successively belonged, it is observed in a note at the beginning of Dr. Zouch's Memoir, that • Puritanism was first introduced into it during the Civil War under Charles I. And yet it's founder, Mildmay, did not escape a twit from his Sovereign upon his schismatic propensities." So, Sir Walter (said Queen Elizabeth, upon his first coming to Court after the completion of his noble undertaking) I hear you have erected a Puritan foundation.” “No, Madam," he replied ; “ far be it froin me to countenance any thing contrary to your established laws: but I have set an acorn which, when it comes to be an oak,

God

to offer my best thanks. Mr. Ingram himself, and Mr. Granville Wheler, have similar claims upon my gratitude.

The very incomplete state of the Attica Eboracensis, or · Yorkshire Biography,' after all my pains would demand an apology, did I not feel that, defective as it is, it may in some degree prove serviceable to future antiquaries. The author had merely collected a few materials: and it appeared to me desirable that these rudiments, the fruits of an industry springing out of grateful attachment to his native county, should not be thrown away. I have ventured to make some slight additions to it, not worth specifying; and many a splendid and venerable name, as the reader will perceive, might have been farther added, if it had been deemed proper, proving still more decisively that

-Souls are nurtured by our northern sky.

The Life of Elijah' presents a plain practical paraphrase upon that portion of the Old Testament (1 Kings xvii. 1.2 Kings ü. 11.) in which the Prophet's history is contained.

In the Attempt to illustrate some of the Prophecies of the Old and New Testament,' Dr, Zouch has justly censured the

God alone knows what will be the fruit of it.” That this fruit, however, proved to be of the flavour so much distasted by her Majesty, there is good evidence:

. In the house of pure Emanuel
I had my education ;

Where some surmise

I dazzled my eyes
With the light of revelation,'-

says the distracted Puritan, in a song composed under King James I. by the witty Bishop Corbet. It was in consequence of this character, that it received large additions to it's endowment by the will of Henry Hastings, third Earl of Huntingdon, who is stated to have lavished a great part of his fortune on the more zealous of the Puritan preachers. Amongst it's more dignified and orthodox sons (to spare living names of the highest distinction) may be enumerated Archbishop Sancroft, and Bishops Hall, Bedell, Kidder, Gardiner, Chandler, Jackson (of Kildare), and Hurd.

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