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" These are thy glorious works, Parent of good, Almighty, thine this universal frame, Thus wondrous fair; thyself how wondrous then ! Unspeakable, who sitt'st above these heavens, To us invisible, or dimly seen In these thy lowest works; yet these declare... "
The Quarterly Review - Page 431
edited by - 1829
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A New Display of the Beauties of England: Or A Description of the Most ...

England - 1776
...lines from Milton's Paradife Loft, Book V. are with a happy propriety infcribed upon it : ** Thefe are thy glorious works, Parent of good ! " Almighty ! thine this universal frame, " Thus wondrous fair ! thyfejf how wondrous then " Unfpeakable! who fits above thefe heavens ' To us invifible, or dimly...
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Extracts of the Journals of the Rev. Dr. Coke's Five Visits to America

Thomas Coke - Missions - 1793 - 189 pages
...which would, I believe, be very entertaining and profitable to iome, but tedious to others. Thefe are thy glorious works, Parent of good! Almighty ! thine this universal frame, Thus wondrous fair; thy Self how wondrous then ! Unfpeakable ! who fitt'ft above thefe heavens, To us invifible, or dimly...
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Paradise Lost: A Poem, in Twelve Books. The Author John Milton. Printed from ...

John Milton - 1795
...verse, More tuneable than needed lute or harp i;t To add more sweetness! and they thus began. These are thy glorious works, Parent of good, Almighty, thine this universal frame, Thus wond'rous fair; thyself how wond'rous tben! Unspeakable, who sit'st above these Heavens To us invisible, or dimly seen...
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Fugitive Pieces: By Frances Greensted

Frances Greensted - English poetry - 1796 - 71 pages
...Can'st thou, ingrate, behold the lovely scene, And not, enraptur'd, with the Bard exclaim, " These are thy glorious works, parent of good, " ALMIGHTY! Thine this universal frame, " Thus wond'rous fair! Thyself how wond'rous then." Here on the grassy hillock sit we down, And, pleas'd, survey the landscape's...
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Paradise Lost: With Notes, Selected from Newton and Others, to ..., Volumes 1-2

John Milton, Samuel Johnson - 1796
...More tuneable than needed lute or harp ii To add more sweetness ; and they thus began: These are thy glorious works, Parent of Good, Almighty, thine this universal frame, Thus wond'rous fair ; thyself how wond'rous then ! 155 Unspeakable, who sit'st above these Heav'ns To us invisible, or...
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The Works of Mrs. Elizabeth Rowe: Letters from the dead to the living ...

Elizabeth Singer Rowe - 1796
...you will think, are very guiltless amusements ; and if I should tell you I have an amour * These are thy glorious works, Parent of good, Almighty, thine this universal frame, Thus wondrous fair; thyself how wondrou* then! Unspeakable MMsn'i Paraitisi Lit', Bock, v. 1. 15-I. altogether as guiltless,...
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The Works of Mrs. Elizabeth Rowe: Letters moral & entertaining, pt. 3 ...

Elizabeth Singer Rowe - 1796
...the summer and winter, the shady night, and the bright revolutions of the day, are thine. These are thy glorious works, Parent of good, Almighty: thine this universal frame : Thus wondrous they ; thyself hoiv wondrous then ? But oh ! what mutt thy essential majesty and beauty be, if thou...
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Paradise lost, a poem. Pr. from the text of Tonson's correct ed. of 1711

John Milton - 1801
...verse, More tuneable than needed lute or harp iji To add more sweetness ! and they thus began. THESE are thy glorious works, Parent of good, Almighty, thine this universal frame, Thus wondrous fair ; thyself how wondrous then ! Unspeakable, who sit'tt above these Heavens 156 To us invisible, or dimly...
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A Rhetorical Grammar: In which the Common Improprieties in Reading and ...

John Walker - Elocution - 1801 - 392 pages
...equivalent either to a comma, colon, semicolon, or period, as the sense demands. EXAMPLE, These are thy glorious works, parent of good ! Almighty ! Thine this universal frame, Thus wondrous fair ! Thyself how wondrous then ! Milton. This is the most concise and comprehensive scheme of punctuation...
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Animal Biography, Or, Authentic Anecdotes of the Lives, Manners ..., Volume 1

William Bingley - Animal behavior - 1803
...reap the advantages of the science, and such advantages as books alone do not always bestow. These are thy glorious works, Parent of Good, Almighty ! Thine this universal frame, Thus wondrous fair; thyself how wondrous then ! Unspeakable, who sitt'st above these Heav'ns, To us invisible, or dimly...
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