Primitive Culture: Researches Into the Development of Mythology, Philosophy, Religion, Language, Art, and Custom, Volume 1

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J. Murray, 1920 - Animism - 973 pages
 

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Page 1 - Civilization, taken in its wide ethnographic | sense, is that complex whole which includes knowledge,! belief, art, morals, law, custom, and any other capabilities' and habits acquired by man as a member of society.
Page 33 - The discoveries of ancient and modern navigators, and the domestic history or tradition of the most enlightened nations, represent the human savage naked both in mind and body, and destitute of laws, of arts, of ideas, and almost of language.
Page 397 - Cant'' is, by some people, derived from one Andrew Cant, who, they say, was a presbyterian minister in some illiterate part of Scotland, who by exercise and use had obtained the faculty, alias gift, of talking in the pulpit in such a dialect, that it is said he was understood by none but his own congregation, and not by all of them.
Page 141 - ... it appears that God hath appointed (for a supernatural sign of the monstrous impiety of witches) that the water shall refuse to receive them in her bosom that have shaken off them the sacred water of baptism and wilfully refused the benefit thereof...
Page 477 - There is an universal tendency among mankind to conceive all beings like themselves, and to transfer to every object, those qualities, with which they are familiarly acquainted, and of which they are intimately conscious.
Page 397 - French, a speech compact thirty years since of English and a great number of odd words of their own devising, without all order or reason ; and yet, such is it as none but themselves are able to understand.
Page 401 - Roman, pitched there ;) yet those old and inborn names of successive kings, never any to have been real persons, or done in their lives at least some part of what so long hath been remembered, cannot be thought without too strict an incredulity.
Page 428 - It seems as though thinking men, as yet at a low level of culture, were deeply impressed by two groups of biological problems. In the first place, what is it that makes the difference between a living body and a dead one; what causes waking, sleep, trance, disease, death ? In the second place, what are those human shapes which appear in dreams and visions?
Page 274 - Of the lands which the river of Time Had left ere he woke on its breast, Or shall reach when his eyes have been closed. Only the tract where he sails He wots of; only the thoughts, Raised by the objects he passes, are his.
Page vii - It may have struck some readers as an omission, that in a work on civilization insisting so strenuously on a theory of development or evolution, mention should scarcely have been made of Mr. Darwin and Mr. Herbert Spencer, whose influence on the whole course of modern thought on such subjects should not be left without formal recognition. This absence of particular reference is. accounted for by the present work, arranged on its own lines, coming scarcely into contact of detail with the previous...

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