Diphtheria, as it Prevailed in the United States from 1860 to 1866: Preceded by an Historical Account of Its Phenomena, Its Nature, and Homoeopathic Treatment

Front Cover
W. Radde, 1867 - Diphtheria - 176 pages

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 16 - A great number of small pimples, of a color distinguishably more intense than that which surrounds them, appear on the arms and other parts. They are larger and more prominent in those parts of the same subject, where the redness is least intense ; which is generally on the arms the breast and lower extremities.
Page 22 - ... opened. This was thrown off by violent coughing or retching, and the efforts made to dislodge it were often so distressing, that the child appeared almost in a state of strangulation. This was succeeded by an abatement of all the symptoms, until a fresh quantity of the same substance was formed, when the distress recurred as before. " Most of the cases which occurred in November and afterwards, were attended with inflammation and swelling of the tonsils, uvula, and velum pendulum palati, and...
Page 11 - Ulcers occur on the tonsils; some, indeed, of an ordinary nature, mild and innocuous; but others of an unusual kind, pestilential and fatal. Such as are clean, small, superficial, without inflammation and without pain, are mild; but such as are broad, hollow, foul, and covered with a white, livid, or black concretion, are pestilential.
Page 26 - ... when the disorder was at the worst, they retained their senses, and would give distinct answers when spoken to, although, on being left to themselves, they lay, for the most part» in a lethargic condition, only raising up now and then to re.
Page 26 - This stage of the disease was attended with a very great and sudden prostration of strength ; a very remarkable hollow dry cough, and a peculiar change in the tone of the voice ; not easily described, but so singular, that a person who had once heard it, could almost certainly know the disease again by hearing the patient cough or speak.
Page 26 - ... again by hearing the patient cough or speak. In some the voice was almost entirely lost, and would continue very weak and low for several weeks after recovery. A constant fever attended this disease, but it was much more remarkable in the night than in the day time -t and in some there was a remarkable remission towards morning.
Page 25 - ... a frequent symptom, did not invariably attend the disease ; and some had all the other symptoms without it. The breath was either no ways offensive, or had only that kind of smell which is occasioned by worms; and the swallowing was very little, if at all, impeded. These symptoms, with a slight fever, at night, continued in some for five or six days, without alarming their friends; in others a difficulty of breathing came on within twenty-four hours...
Page 26 - ... swallowing was very little, if at all, impeded. These symptoms, with a slight fever, at night, continued in some for five or six days, without alarming their friends; in others a difficulty of breathing came on within twenty-four hours, especially in the time of sleep, and was often suddenly encreased to so great a degree as to threaten immediate suffocation. In general, however, it came on later, increased more gradually, and was not constant, but the patient would now and then enjoy an interval...
Page 2 - ENTERED, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1842, BY D. APPLETON & COMPANY, in the Clerk's Office of the District Conrt of the United States, for the Southern District of New York.
Page 97 - The Egyptian disease § is not communicated by volatile invisible emanations, susceptible of being dissolved in the air and of acting at a great distance from their point of origin. It no more possesses this quality than the syphilitic disease. If the liquid which issues...

Bibliographic information