The Massachusetts Teacher: A Journal of School and Home Education, Volume 3

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Mass. Teachers' Association., 1850 - Education
 

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Page 201 - Like the vase, in which roses have once been distilled — You may break, you may shatter the vase if you will. But the scent of the roses will hang round it still.
Page 191 - And though all the winds of doctrine were let loose to play upon the earth, so Truth be in the field, we do injuriously by licensing and prohibiting to misdoubt her strength. Let her and Falsehood grapple; who ever knew Truth put to the worse in a free and open encounter?
Page 205 - Pause not to dream of the future before us ; Pause not to weep the wild cares that come o'er us : Hark how Creation's deep, musical chorus, Unintermitting, goes up into Heaven ! Never the ocean- wave falters in flowing; Never the little seed stops in its growing; More and more richly the Rose-heart keeps glowing, Till from its nourishing stem it is riven. 1 Labor is worship !' — the robin is singing,
Page 224 - ... to impress on the minds of children and youth, committed to their care and instruction, the principles of piety, justice, and a sacred regard to truth, love to their country, humanity, and universal benevolence, sobriety, industry, and frugality, chastity, moderation and temperance, and those other virtues, which are the ornament of human society, and the basis upon which a republican constitution is founded...
Page 304 - Surely in vain is the net spread in the sight of any bird," or, before the eyes of every thing that hath a wing, as in the original.
Page 151 - For precept must be upon precept, precept upon precept ; line upon line, line upon line ; here a little, and there a little...
Page 122 - Admission to its sanctuary, and to the privileges and feelings of a votary, is only to be gained by one means — sound and sufficient knowledge of mathematics, the great instrument of all exact inquiry, without which no man can ever make such advances in this or any other of the higher departments of science as can entitle him to form an independent opinion on any subject of discussion within their range.
Page 183 - The changing spirits' rise and fall ; We know that these were felt by him, For these are felt by all. He suffer'd, — but his pangs are o'er ; Enjoy'd,- — but his delights are fled ; Had friends, — his friends are now no more; And foes, — his foes are dead. He...
Page 204 - I shall detain you no longer in the demonstration of what we should not do, but straight conduct you to a hill-side, where I will point you out the right path of a virtuous and noble education; laborious indeed at the first ascent, but else so smooth, so green, so full of goodly prospect and melodious sounds on every side, that the harp of Orpheus was not more charming.
Page 192 - Phoebus is himself thy sire. To thee of all things upon earth, Life is no longer than thy mirth. Happy insect ! happy thou, Dost neither age nor winter know ! But when thou 'st drunk, and danced, and sung Thy fill, the flowery leaves among, (Voluptuous and wise withal, Epicurean animal !) Sated with thy summer feast, Thou retir'st to endless rest.

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