Richter:deuteronomistic History Bzaw 318

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Walter de Gruyter, 2002 - Religion - 246 pages
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This monograph is a comparative, socio-linguistic reassessment of the Deuteronomic idiom, leshakken shemo sham, and its synonymous biblical reflexes in the Deuteronomistic History, lashum shemo sham, and lihyot shemo sham. These particular formulae have long been understood as evidence of the Name Theology - the evolution in Israelite religion toward a more abstracted mode of divine presence in the temple. Utilizing epigraphic material gathered from Mesopotamian and Levantine contexts, this study demonstrates that leshakken shemo sham and lashum shemo sham are loan-adaptations of Akkadian shuma shakanu, an idiom common to the royal monumental tradition of Mesopotamia. The resulting retranslation and reinterpretation of the biblical idiom profoundly impacts the classic formulation of the Name Theology.

 

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Contents

List of Figures
6
B The Deuteronomistic History the Name Theology
7
ANewParadigm
36
The fSakken fmo Sam Formula in Deuteronomy
46
The lasum fmo Sam Formula in the Deuteronomistic History
49
The lihyot and lasum Formulae in the Deuteronomistic History and the Chroniclers History
51
B The Biblical Occurrences of the Deuteronomic Formula
53
The libnot bayit fem YHWH Formula in 1 Kings 8
80
Could Deuteronomys fSakken Be Borrowed into Biblical
121
Classifying the Inscriptions
136
Suma Sakanu and the Monumental Corpus
153
The Hiphil Occurrences of Skn in the Hebrew Bible 104
164
The Journey to the Cedar Forest
170
to place the name until distant days
179
E Suma Satra Sakanu and the Monumental Corpus
184
F Suma Sakanu in the Levant
199

The Translation of the Deuteronomic Formula
96
The Semantic Field of Biblical Hebrew Skn
99
8b Biblical Hebrew Skn
105
8c Biblical Hebrew Skn
120
The Meaning of the fSakken fmo Sam formula
207
Bibliography
219
Index of Texts
243
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

The author is presently an Assistant Professor of Old Testament at Asbury Theological Seminary.

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