The Pestalozzian primer. With Appendix, relative to a plan for cultivating the sight of the deaf and dumb with a view to their being taught to speak

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Page 18 - I must hence to work while it is called to-day, for the night cometh when no man can work.
Page 23 - For what the law could not do, in that it was weak through the flesh, God sending his own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh, and for sin condemned sin in the flesh; that the righteousness of the law might be fulfilled in us who walk not after the flesh, but after the Spirit.
Page 144 - The next vowel sound is ai, — as heard in the words <zz,r, b,ay, &c. The mechanism of it is produced, by raising the jaw so as to make the two rows of front teeth come within half an inch of each other, and the upper surface of the tongue, of course, come within about three-quarters of an inch of the arch of the hard palate, and by emitting vocalized breath or voice, through this mechanism tii...
Page 144 - While these parts of the mouth are in this position, we cause vocalized breath, or voice, to be formed in the larynx, by the vibration of its sides from the outward current of air, and emit it through this mechanism, which thus articulates the sound of...
Page 126 - ... in this point of view, there is no real distinction whatever, between vowels and consonants, both being, in whispering, affections of mere breath ; but in common speaking, wherein voice is always used, there is this distinction between vowels and consonants, that in the former we use a distinct musical sound in the larynx, along with each of them, and emit it through their peculiar mechanisms, while even in the vocal consonants there is only a non-musical murmur of the voice.
Page 74 - ... unacquainted with its peculiar sound, he must find some person who knows how to pronounce French correctly, and learn it from him. " There are perhaps also two other distinct vowel sounds in English, one of which, however, does not in it ever occur, long or accented, nor of course is it ever met alone. But as it does occur in other languages long, though not in English, if any one pleases, he may teach it here also. It is the sound...
Page 51 - ... is produced. This mechanism may be seen or felt, and by careful attention we become conscious of it ourselves. Again we quote from the book. "1. Every word spoken or written has a meaning, or idea, with which all the persons, who use that language, either in speech or writing, have agreed to connect it. 2. — All the words in every spoken language are composed of a few simple sounds, produced by peculiar corresponding variations of the manner of allowing the breath or voice to escape through...
Page 69 - Thus, as to > in bid, it is the short sound of <e in deed ; and with respect to the sound of e in bed, it is similar to a semitone, and therefore is so indistinct, that no use could be made of it in this stage, never being pronounced long, nor accented, nor unconnected with a consonant. There is certainly, however, a marked difference made in England between the sound of a in far or ca'n't, or in the end of papa, and of a in fat or cant, the former being pronounced almost exactly like what is called...
Page 126 - ... n, ng, have a vocal sound, essential to them, but it is emitted through the nose, and therefore cannot possibly be a vowel sound; and besides they can be united with or z, without any vowel, as in ms, mz ; iu, nz ; ngs, ngz ; or in 5m, zm; sn,zn; snif, zng.
Page 66 - ... vr, at the commencement of a syllable in French, as in — vrai, (true,) which never so occurs in English. We would first direct our ears, and exert our mental attention, to catch and appreciate each of the sounds, either new or newly combined, which were found in the words, that we heard, which, until then, would seem all confused and hurried. Soon our auditory faculty would become capable of distinguishing these sounds, each from each, and thus we should acquire a distinct idea of every one...

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