Thinking, Fast and Slow

Front Cover
Allen Lane, 2011 - Cognition - 499 pages
Daniel Kahneman, Nobel laureate in Economics for his seminal work in psychology that challenged the rational model of judgment and decision making, is one of our most important thinkers. His ideas have had a profound impact on many fields, but he has never brought them together in one book. Here, he explains the two systems that drive the way we think. System 1 is fast, intuitive, and emotional; System 2 is slower, more deliberative, and more logical. Kahneman exposes the capabilities--and also the faults and biases--of fast thinking, and reveals the pervasive influence of intuitive impressions on our thoughts and behavior. Then he reveals where we can and cannot trust our intuitions and how we can tap into the benefits of slow thinking. He offers practical and enlightening insights into how choices are made in both our business and our personal lives--and how we can use different techniques to guard against the mental glitches that often get us into trouble.--From publisher description.

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User Review  - RobertDay - LibraryThing

I bought a copy of this book on the recommendation of a colleague in the software testing community, and I struggled with it until bailing out at around the 65% mark. The basic premise, that we have a ... Read full review

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User Review  - grandpahobo - LibraryThing

This is a fascinating book. The author explains how the human mind works is a detailed, yet easily understood fashion. I have purchased copies for both my children and will re-read it again. Read full review

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About the author (2011)

DANIEL KAHNEMAN is Eugene Higgins Professor of Psychology Emeritus at Princeton University and a professor of public affairs at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. He is the only non-economist to have won the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences; it was awarded to him in 2002 for his pioneering work with Amos Tversky on decision-making.

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