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Causes of Increase and Variations in the

Amount of the Poor's Rate
Seasons of Scarcity
Enquiry as to the Seasons and their Effects
Interference of Magistrates
Occurrences in 1795
Consequences
Explanation of the Increase and Decrease

86 ib. 88 90 91 92 ib.

CHAP. III.

Effects of the Mal-administration of the Poor

Laws on Morals and Industry
Effects upon unmarried Men
Effects upon unmarried Women
Immorality incompatible with Industry
Consequent Carelessness and Recklessness
Diminution of Work done by Labourers

95 ib. 96 ib. 97 ib.

CHAP. IV.

Effect of the Mal-administration of the Poor

Laws on Population Effect upon

the Number of Births Effect of a contrary System Errors committed in attempts to establish a

Rate of Increase

98 ib. 99

ib.

CHAP. V.

Practice-illegal
Provisions of 43 Eliz.
Distinction between Work and Relief

100 ib.

101

Page

Agricultural Labourers not contemplated by

the 43 Eliz. Abuses greatest in Agricultural Counties Questions put to the Judges as to the Legality

of the Practice

102 103

104

CHAP. VI.

105 ib.

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Remedy
System established in the Parish of Cookham
Parish to be the hardest Master and lowest

Payer
Adopted in other Parishes
How it operates
How to be brought about
Practicable in all Parishes
Inadequacy of Acts of Parliament
Course to be taken

106 107 108 110 112 113 114

CHAP. VII.
Expedients for the Relief of the Poor
Grant of Portions of Land
System in the North of England
General Enclosure Act
Enabling Bills
Dangers to be apprehended therefrom
Emigration
All at best only Mitigants

115 ib. ib. 116 117

ib. 118 ib.

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years of

| We have enjoyed seventeen

peace, during which our shipping, and our exports of home produce and manufacture, have increased in a greater proportion than ever they did in any previous period of our history ; yet distress has, nevertheless, prevailed generally throughout the country, and particularly in the agricultural districts. A transition from war to peace has always produced a revulsion, as a transition from peace to war has done, and to the extent of the revulsion there always has been distress; but such distress has heretofore passed away with the consequences of the revulsion which produced it. It was reserved for our times, that distress should not only continue, but should increase, throughout so long a period of peace.

But distress is not confined to Great Britain. It prevails in every country in Europe. It is only felt more severely in Great Britain than in other countries, except France, in which it is felt still more severely than it is in Great Britain.

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