The Air

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Thomas Ward & Company, 1835 - Air - 280 pages
 

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Page 254 - And it shall come to pass, when I bring a cloud over the earth , that the bow shall be seen in the cloud : and I will remember my covenant which is between me and you, and every living creature of all flesh ; and the waters shall no more become a flood to destroy all flesh.
Page i - ... the relative actions of the air in different parts of the world, and at different seasons of the year, discussed as portions of physical geography ; and its relations to moisture, heat, and motion, designated as
Page 174 - For finding the height in feet, subtract the logarithm of the upper station from that of the lower, multiply by six, and remove the decimal point four places to the right ; the result is the elevation in English feet, generally sufficiently accurate for purposes to which a mountain-barometer should be applied.
Page 96 - ... the means of indulging in every luxury; but, not all his science could invent, not all his art could execute, and not all his wealth, were it multiplied till the line of figures extended round the earth, could bring to him one single inhalation of the breath of life ; and, therefore, in the midst of all his possessions, all his power, and all his...
Page 8 - ... stratum of air, however thin, then there is no more weight to be moved than the simple weight of the substance,—that is, the gravitation of the substance toward the earth is the only resistance to be overcome in removing that substance from the earth. Thus, for instance, when a man walks along the pavement or a firm footpath, he has no weight to lift...
Page 7 - The air every where surrounds the earth to a height far exceeding that of the highest mountains, even if we were to suppose its weight the same at all elevations, which is not the case. But not only does it surround the entire globe, for it surrounds every detached piece of matter whenever that piece of matter is in any way moved, or made...
Page 277 - In animals of more energetic life, this apparatus is much too delicate for our being able to approach it with the eye of science when it is in the working state; and, after death has passed upon it, one of the acts of this death may, for aught we know, be the dissolution of this mysterious connection between artery and vein, upon which life so immediately depends.
Page 274 - ... a little before it reaches the heart, it receives into its mass the chyle or new matter which has been prepared by the various operations of digestion, for the nourishment of the animal. This blood is, therefore, in what we may consider a rude state; so much of it is, no doubt, healthy blood, but with this healthy blood there are...
Page 273 - ... which sends the blood to the lungs, or aerating apparatus; and another which sends the blood which has been in the lungs, and has undergone the necessary action of the air there, all over the body of the animal, to stimulate and nourish the whole of its system. The terminations of the arteries, and commencements of the veins in the lungs...

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