A Manual of Blow-pipe Analysis: And Determinative Mineralogy

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T.E. Zell, 1867 - Blowpipe - 159 pages

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Page iv - ENTERED, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1842, BY D. APPLETON & COMPANY, in the Clerk's Office of the District Conrt of the United States, for the Southern District of New York.
Page 35 - Fl., becomes opaque when the flame strikes it in an unequal or intermittent manner. This operation has received the name of "flaming," and any substance thus acted upon is said to become "opaque by flaming." The third and fourth columns of Tables I. and II. exhibit the behavior of the most important oxides to borax and salt of phosphorus. In Table III. the oxides are arranged with reference to the color which they impart to the beads in O. Fl. and R. Fl.
Page 55 - The iron is oxidized at the expense of the phosphoric acid, causing the formation of a borate of the oxide of iron, which fuses at a sufficiently high temperature. The bead is then taken from the...
Page 42 - ... open glass tube, evolve sulphurous acid and yield a sublimate of arsenous oxide. To show in a very decisive manner the presence of arsenic in any of its combinations with sulphur, the powdered assay [No. 80] is mixed with four volumes of neutral oxalate of potassa and a little charcoal powder, or with six parts of a mixture of equal parts of cyanide of potassium and carbonate of soda, the mass introduced into a tube sealed at one end, and heat applied, at first very gently but gradually raised...
Page 61 - Breithaupt, is as follows: 1. Talc; common laminated light-green variety. 2. Gypsum ; crystalline variety. 3. Calcite; transparent variety. 4. Fluorite; crystalline variety. 5. Apatite; transparent variety. 6. Orthoclase; white cleavable variety. 7. Quartz; transparent. 8. Topaz; transparent. 9. Corundum; cleavable varieties. 10. Diamond.
Page 60 - Scratches a copper coin, but is also scratched by it, being aboiit the same hardness. 4. Not scratched by a copper coin. Does not scratch glass. 5. Scratches glass with difficulty, leaving its powder on it, Yields readily to the knife. 6. Scratches glass easily. Yields with great difficulty to the knife. 7. Does not yield to the knife, while the latter leaves a steel streak on the mineral.
Page 61 - Talc ; common laminated light-green variety. 2. Gypsum ; crystalline variety. 3. Calcite ; transparent variety. 4. Fluorite ; crystalline variety. 5. Apatite; transparent variety. 6. Orthoclase; white cleavable variety. 7. Quartz; transparent. 8. Topaz; transparent. 9. Corundum ; cleavable varieties. 10. Diamond. To test the hardness of a mineral we may proceed in two different manners : firstly, by attempting to scratch it with the minerals enumerated in the scale, successively ; or, secondly, by...
Page 60 - Yields with difficulty to the nail, or merely receives an impression from it. Does not scratch a copper coin. 3. Scratches a copper coin ; but is also scratched by it, being of about the same degree of hardness. 4. Not scratched by a copper coin ; does not scratch glass. 5. Scratches glass, though with difficulty, leaving its powder upon it.
Page 162 - Oxide of Nickel; on cooling, reddish-brown to brown. Sesquioxide of Manganese ; on cooling, violet-red. Oxide of Nickel, containing Cobalt ; on cooling, brownish.
Page 145 - Sx on Platinum Wire. With SPh on Platinum Wire. The Carbonate dissolves with effervescence to a limpid glass which, when in a certain state of saturation, may be made opaque by flaming; when still more saturated, it becomes opaque on cooling, even without flaming. As with Borax. Presents the same phenomena as Baryta. Presents the same phenomena Baryta. Readily dissolved to a limpid glass, which becomes opaque by flaming. The Carbonate dissolves with effervescence. On a large addition of Lime the...

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