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METHODIST NEW CONNEXION

MAGAZINE

AND

EVANGELICAL REPOSITORY,

FOR THE YEAR 1854.

VOL. XXII.-THIRD SERIES.

VOL. FIFTY-SEVEN, FROM THE COMMENCEMENT.

LONDON: WILLIAM COOKE,

EDITOR AND BOOK-STEWARD,
METHODIST NEW CONNEXION BOOK-ROOM,

No. 3, ALBANY CRESCENT, ALBANY ROAD, OLD KENT ROAD.

LONDON:

PETTER AND GALPIN, PRINTERS, PLAYHOUSE YARD,

ADJOINING THE "TIMES” OFFICE.

PREFACE.

We may

A YEAR of remarkable vicissitude is now closing upon us. sing of mercy and of judgment. An abundant harvest has been graciously given; but the pestilence has swept away multitudes of mankind ;-war has widely spread desolation and death over the earth-shipwrecks, fires, and railway accidents have added to our calamities, and augmented the victims of the fell destroyer. While conflicts and catastrophes have thus agitated the world, large sections of the church have been torn and convulsed by internal dissensions. How suggestive these events !-how admonitory to the church of God! They rebuke our worldliness and apathy; they summon us to repentance, to prayer, to increased spirituality, earnestness, and zeal. God has evidently a controversy with the nations of the earth, and he utters a loud reproof to his unfaithful church. As the conductors of our periodical, we have felt it a duty to lay these facts before our friends, and inculcate from time to time the admonitory lessons they teach. The various doctrines and duties of our holy religion have been asserted, the biography of our departed friends, and the movements of our religious denomination, have been stated, for the edification of our readers; yet we deeply feel how inadequately this has been done, compared with the solemnities of the times and the responsibility of our position.

Yet have we cause for gratitude and encouragement. We have peace, consolidation, and union in our body, to which, we trust, the pages of our magazine have contributed. We are thankful to God for the measure of health which has enabled us to prosecute our labours to the close of another year, and the opportunities afforded of being in any degree useful in one sphere, when physical

infirmity prevented it in another; we are thankful to our brethren for the kind assistance they bave rendered in supplying material for our pages; and we are encouraged by a considerable enlargement in the sphere of our labours by an increase of several hundred subscribers. To esteemed ministers and friends, therefore, we present our cordial thanks for all past favours, and entreat a coutinuance of their help,knowing, as they do, that, while their services are highly appreciated by the Editor, they are promoting the best interests of a community cordially approved in its principles by their deliberate judgment, and endeared to their affections by hallowed associations. May the coming year be one of more vigour, efficiency, and prosperity in every department of our beloved community!

THE EDITOR.

3, ALBANY CRESCENT, ALBANY ROAD, LONDON,

November, 1854.

THE METHODIST

NEW CONNEXION MAGAZINE.

JANUARY, 1854.

BIOGRAPHY.

MEMOIR OF THE REV. THOMAS WATERHOUSE,

BY HIS SON, WILLIAM HENRY WATERHOUSE, BIOGRAPHY is the modern method of embalming the distinguished dead. Instead of withholding the lifeless body, consigned by divine decree to its native dust, and impregnating it with “sweet spices,” lest it should say to corruption, thou art my father: to the worm, thou art my mother and my sister,—we bury our dead out of our sight, go to the grave to weep there, cherish the remembrance of excellency no more seen, and commit to the historic page, to endure through all time, the story of departed goodness and consecrated worth.

When a man of eminent usefulness, and of high office in the Christian Church, is suddenly cut off in the midst of his toils, what a dreary void is at once created! Though the hoary head and the full age truly foretoken that “the righteous perisheth,” how grievous is the stroke which takes him for ever away! Is he a husband ? a parent ? a benefactor ? a good minister ? Each relation numbers its bereaved, and the heart knoweth its own bitterness. While it is to me a source of profound regret that the venerable deceased left no written memorial of his long and arduous career, I shall count it the highest distinction to which I have yet attained, should it be found that as a son in the gospel, I have worthily borne witness of him.

My revered and most excellent parent, the Rev. Thomas Waterhouse, was born in the year 1780, at Foster Houses, near Drax, a small village about six miles from the town of Selby, in the West Riding of Yorkshire. His father was a respectable farmer, and a man of shrewd understanding, and good moral character. His mother was a thrifty and pious woman, but she died when the subject of this memoir was only nine years of age. Their family included three children, and Thomas, the first born, and the only son, largely shared in the fond affection of the parental heart. Often had the aspiring father used to say of him, that he intended Thomas to be a great man, meaning, he designed him to be a merchant, an eminent business and mercantile

For this purpose he educated him with a view to his future vocation, and besides diligent attendance at school, he was one of a select class whom the rector of the village taught, and it is but fair to add, that his general proficiency realized the warm wishes and hopes that were indulged of him. It is a slight circumstance, perhaps, to

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