A Century of Dishonour

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, May 22, 2014 - History - 472 pages
Author and activist Helen Hunt Jackson (1830-85) is remembered for her work in support of Native American rights. She was also a friend and correspondent of the poet Emily Dickinson, and her own verse was praised by Ralph Waldo Emerson. Her highly popular novel Ramona (1884) addressed discrimination against Native Americans, raising public consciousness as Harriet Beecher Stowe had done for slavery in Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852). Jackson's novel emerged out of her passionate seeking of justice for her country's indigenous peoples. She describes decades of government-sanctioned mistreatment of Native Americans in this 1881 publication. The work introduces seven major tribes, their claims to ancestral lands, and the history of broken treaties and massacres they had endured. Alongside this, Jackson also presents details of Native American culture, resilience and creativity. This remains a vital and substantial account of minority persecution in North American history.
 

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Contents

INTRODUCTION BY PRESIDENT JULIUS H SEELYE
1
CHAPTER I
9
CHAPTER II
32
THE CHEYENNES
66
CHAPTER IV
103
CHAPTER VI
186
CHAPTER VII
257
CHAPTER IX
298
CHAPTER X
336
APPENDIX
343
THE PONCA CASE
359
TESTIMONIES TO INDIAN CHARACTER
374
OUTRAGES COMMITTED ON INDIANSBY WHITEs
381
ACCOUNT OF SOME OF THE OLD GRIEVANCES OF THE SIOUX
389
LETTER FROM SARAH WINNEMUCCA AN EDUCATED PAH UTE
395
WOODCUTTING BY INDIANS 1N DAKOTA
407

Massacres of Apaches
324

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