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KITCHEN GARDENER'S INSTRUCTOR,

CONTAINING A CATALOGUE OF

GARDEN AND HERB SEED,

WITH

PRACTICAL DIRECTIONS UNDER EACH HEAD

FOR THE CULTIVATION OF

CULINARY VEGETABLES AND HERBS.

WITH A CALENDAR,

SHOWING THE WORK NECESSARY TO BE DONE IN A KITCHEN GARDEN

EVERY MONTH THROUGHOUT THE SEASON.

ALSO, DIRECTIONS FOR

FORCING OR FORWARDING VEGETABLES

OUT OF THE ORDINARY SEASON.

THE WHOLT ADAPTED TO THE CLIMATE ON THE UNITED STAT9

A NEW AND IMPROVEU EDITION,

By THOMAS BRIDGEMAN,

Gardener, Seedsman, and Florist.

NEW-YORK :

FOR SALE BY THE AUTHOR, BROADWAY, CORNER OF EIGHTEENTH STREET,
J. M. Thorburn & Co., 15 John-street, Alex. Smith, 388 Broadway, Dunlap & Thompson,
Broadway, N. Y. Wm. Thorburn, Broadway, Albany C. F. Crosman, Rochester , Ho
vey & Co., Joseph Breck & Co., J. L. L. F. Warren, Walker & Co., Boston; David
Landreth, H. A. Dreer, Robert Buist, Philadelphia ; Gibson & Ritchie, Newark, N. J.;
R. Sinclair, Jr., & Co., Baltimore; J. F. Callan, Wnshington City; Henry Cook, Alex.
andria, D. C. Frederick Wittvenn, Charleston, S. C. ; Mosely & Co., Mobile; Wm.
Dinn, New Orleans; Jas. M. Thorburn, St. Louis ; Ely & Campbell, H. Huxley, Cin-
cinnati ; Charles A. Peabody, Columbus, Ga. ; A. G. Munn, Louisville, Ky.; and other
Seedsmen.–Also, by Booksellers in general.

1847.

Printed by A. Hanford, 58 Nassau-street.

B75
1847

Sift of C.H. Honey

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AANI KARYACHOUL TURE DEPT

(Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year Eighteen Hundra! and Forty-seven by Thomas BRIDGEMAN, in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States, for the Southern District of New-York.)

PREFACE.

“THE YOUNG GARDENER'S ASSISTANT” having been extended to five times its original size, by the introduction of various additional subjects connected with Horticulture, I have been induced to publish that part which relates to the cultivation of Culinary Vegetables, Pot Herbs, &c., in a separate form, under the title of “ The Kitchen Gardener's Instructor.” This has been done with a view to enable our respectable seedsmen to afford instruction, at a trifling expense, to those of their customers whose attention may be directed wholly to that branch of Horticulture, and thereby prevent themselves being blamed by those who may not have given their seed a fair trial, from not knowing how to dispose of it in the ground.

Having had twenty-four years' experience as a gardener and seedsman, in the vicinity of New-York, I am aware of the importance of correct information on the subject of gardening; and, from a conviction that the reputation of many honest seedsmen is often unjustly attacked in consequence of the failure of seed, when the fault lies not with them, but with the gardener, I have endeavoured, in my humble way, to render myself useful both to the seedsman and gardener, by giving brief directions for the management of a Kitchen Garden, in such a way as is calculated to insure success.

But, as much depends on minute attention to points apparently trifling, I would remind my readers that the products of the garden are natives of various soils and climates, and that while some vegetables can only be raised in cool and temperate weather, others require the heat of the summer to bring them to perfection. This consideration should induce gardeners to watch the seasons as they pass, and also

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to plant their seed at suitable depths and distances, according to their nature and dimensions, as an opportunity of raising some of the luxuries of the garden being lost for tho season, may occasion more anxiety and trouble, than it would cost to acquire a correct knowledge of the art of Gardening.

It is, however, of the utmost importance to a gardener that he obtain such seed as will grow freely, and produce vegetables calculated to suit the market. As I value my reputation above all things upon earth, charity forbids me to believe that any man of standing would wilfully sell bad seed. It is true, that the most careful may at times be deceived, especially in seasons when a full supply of fresh seed cannot be obtained from their regular growers; but, in general, our established seedsman may be supposed to know the true character of his stock; and if he studies his interest, he will not knowingly sell an article that is not calculated to do him credit. It must, however, be admitted, that knowledge is as necessary to a seedsman as to a gardener, and therefore the above remarks cannot apply to every storekeeper who may sell seed, because many, being mere agents, do not pretend to know one kind of seed from another; and from its not being a primary object with them, it cannot be expected that they will take the same interest in the traffic as a regular seedsman, and therefore such agents may not consider their reputation at stake.

The experience of old and skilful gardeners will bear witness to the fact, that failures often occur even with good seed, and with the very best attention on the part of the gardener. It often happens that insects so infest the land, as to devour the seed while sprouting, and before a plant is seen above ground. Sometimes a serious drought succeeding a heavy rain will cause seed to perish through incrustation of the soil; and very frequently seed will fail to vegetate in dry soils and seasons, for want of pressure. I was once called upon by a neighbour to examine his garden, in which

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