Planning, Proposing, and Presenting Science Effectively: A Guide for Graduate Students and Researchers in the Behavioral Sciences and Biology

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Cambridge University Press, Nov 2, 2006 - Science
This concise guide to planning, writing, and presenting research is intended for biology students of all levels, especially those in behavioral ecology, The reader is guided through a discussion of the nature of scientific research, how to plan research, and how to obtain funding. The authors give advice and guidelines for presenting results at research seminars and scientific meetings, and also provide useful tips on preparing abstracts and posters for scientific meetings. They discuss how to write an effective C.V. and give general tips on how to write clearly. The book is illuminated throughout with personal examples from the authors' own experiences and emphasis is placed on problems associated with field studies. All biologists will find this a valuable resource and guide for the early years of their scientific careers and established faculty will find it an essential instructional tool.
 

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Contents

using computers is explained in Chapter 3 Be sure to
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Only current pending and intended submissions should be listed
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advisor must prepare condensed versions of your cvs Tips on
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allow time for any mishaps in the submission process Most
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program officers are willing to discuss your reviews and provide
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3
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John Lyly c 15541606
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generally require the institutional affiliations of the authors and
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4
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The speaking in perpetual hyperbole is comely in nothing but
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some individuals may appear forced and therefore ineffective for
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A forceful and useful way to end a talk is
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good slides This section tells you how to prepare slides
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orange and similar combinations with little color contrast Also be
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fonts those having little marks on the characters as
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and 1024 768 pixels respectively Higherresolution projectors
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categories in order to merit coauthorship When distinctions between
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Section heads and subdivision
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specific predictions that were tested by the study These predictions
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statements about what might be done in future studies are
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each stating its own methods and results as separate subheads
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requisite sentence written into the manuscript with only the number
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Literature cited in some journals instead of Bibliography or
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not be the first city listed on the title page
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We close this section with a reminder to check carefully
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reference has a different permanent accession number When you
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footnote numbers but rather by bibliographic numbers Therefore if
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terminal list is arbitrary and so a common practice is
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may also be written as a title Anything else in
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here Some issues are discussed in Chapter 4 on presenting
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photographs of birds The Wilson Bulletin still does this but
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Most journals use initial caps in such citations but others
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one or more large tables you would not want to
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figures drawn in graphics or other software programs on to
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PowerPoint but no rule of thumb exists for the perfect
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computer and software guides about the most reliable and compatible
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his computer lacked a writable drive and therefore none of
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than in a general seminar putting an onus on you
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Abstracts submitted online should also be typed in a word
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with three separate sets of results It is legitimate to
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or oral paper may depend on the material you intend
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5
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Samuel Johnson 170984
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papers with the federal government when hiring people who are
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did not get along well The committees having discovered the
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Awards and honors sensu stricto
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class of elected membership to recognize accomplishment of junior
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The type of funding liable to be part of the
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reference more difficult to locate in a library and seeming
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jobs so we do recommend that you are prepared
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Graduate students may also be active on campus in some
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About the author (2006)

Jack P. Hailman is Professor Emeritus of Zoology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and Research Associate of Archbold Biological Station in Florida. His research focuses on the behavior of birds.

Karen B. Strier is Professor of Anthropology at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. She has recently been elected to the National Academy of Sciences, USA. Her research focuses on primate behavioral ecology and conservation.

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