The Works of the Author of The Night-thoughts: In Three Volumes, Volume 1

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F. and C. Rivington, 1802 - 383 pages
 

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Page vii - to rhyme. The excellence of this work is not exactness, " but copiousness: particular lines are not to be regarded; " the power is in the whole; and in the whole there is a " magnificence like that ascribed to Chinese plantations, the " magnificence of vast extent and endless diversity." So far Dr. Johnson.—Mr. Croft says,
Page 90 - While Ia moment name, a moment's past; I'm nearer death in this verse, than the last: What then is to be done ? Be wise with speed; A fool at forty is a fool indeed. And what so foolish as the chance of fame ? How vain the prize! how impotent our aim
Page 30 - Open with Pray'r, the consecrated day; " Tune Thy great praise, and bid my soul arise, " And with the mounting sun ascend the skies: " As that advances, let my zeal improve, " And glow with ardour of consummate love; " Nor cease at eve, but with the Setting Sun " My endless worship shall be still begun.
Page 29 - Who decks the maiden Spring with flow'ry pride ? " Who calls forth Summer, like a sparkling bride ? " Who joys the mother Autumn's bed to crown ? " And bids old winter lay her honours down ? " Not the Great OTTOMAN, or Greater CZAR, " Not Europe's arbitress of peace and war. " May sea and land, and earth and
Page vii - the two or three first have been perused more eagerly and " more frequently than the rest. When he got as far as the " fourth or fifth, his original motive for taking up the pen " was answered: his grief was naturally either diminished " or exhausted. We still find the same pious poet; but we
Page 146 - Let them cant on, since they have got the knack, " And dress their notions, like themselves, in black ; " Fright us with terrors of a world unknown, " From joys of this, to keep them all their own. " Of earth's fair fruits, indeed, they claim a fee ; .
Page 136 - graces shine ? They, like the sun, irradiate all between ; The body charms because the soul is seen. Hence, men are often captives of a face, They know not why, of no peculiar grace: Some forms, tho' bright, no mortal man can bear; Some, none resist, tho
Page 141 - of five-pence, as the veriest cit; And quite as much detested as a wit. Can gold calm passion, or make reason shine ? Can we dig peace, or wisdom, from the mine ? Wisdom to gold prefer; for 'tis much less
Page 69 - follies, from each distant land, Like arts, improve in Britain's skilful hand; When the Law shews her teeth, but dares not bite, And 'South-sea treasures are not brought to light; When Churchmen Scripture for the Classics quit, Polite apostates from God's Grace to Wit; When men grow great from their revenue spent
Page 198 - She scorns the rider, and pursuing steed. How rich the Peacock! J what bright glories run From plume to plume, and vary in the sun ! Here we may observe, that our judicious as well as sublime author, just touches the great points of distinction in each creature, and then hastens to another. A description is exact when you cannot

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