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County; on the east by a line from Torreones to the southeast corner of Rio Arriba County, and from Torreones south to Salinas in Galisteo Mountain and thence to Cibolo Spring; on the south by a line from Cibolo Spring to San Ysidro; and on the west by a line from San Ysidro to Juan Lopez, thence to the mouth of Las Bocas Cañon, and from that point to the Rio Arriba County line.

San Miguel County was bounded on the north by Rio Arriba and Taos counties; on the west by Santa Fé County; on the east by the Texas line; and on the south by a line from Cibolo Spring to Berrendo Spring and thence due east to the Texas line.

Santa Ana County was bounded on the north by Rio Arriba County; on the east by Santa Fé County; on the west by the California line; and on the south by a line running west from a point between Bernalillo and the lands previously belonging to the Santa Ana Indians to the California line, and to the east from the said point to the parallel dividing Santa Fé County from San Miguel County.8

Bernalillo County was bounded on the west by the California line; on the north by Santa Ana and San Miguel counties; on the east by the Texas line; and on the south by a line running west from the Bosque de los Pinos to the Quelites del Puerco and continuing in the direction of the Cañon of Juan Tafoya until it reaches the California line, and east from the Bosque de los Pinos to the Cañon Infierno and thence to the Texas line.

Valencia County was bounded on the west by the California line; on the north by Bernalillo County; on the east by the Texas line; and on the south by a line running to the west from a point between the town of José Pino and the house of José Antonio Chavez, thence crossing the Rio Grande on the dividing line between Belen and Sabinal, and continuing in the direction of the Cañada of the Alamito

6Ibid., p. 291.
71bid., p. 291.
8Ibid., p. 292.
'New Mexico. Session Laws, 1851-52, p. 292.

del Rio Puerco and the Puerto de la Bolita de Oro to the California line, and to the east from the point between the town of José Pino and the house of José Antonio Chavez to the Bocas Abo, and thence east to the Texas line.10

Socorro County was bounded on the west by the California line; on the north by Valencia County; on the east by the Texas line; and on the south by a line running to the west from the Muerto Spring, in the Jornado, to the California line, and to the east from the Muerto Spring to the Texas line.11

Doña Ana County was bounded on the north by Socorro County; on the east by the Texas line; on the south by the Texas and the Mexico line, and on the west by the Mexico line 12

The first change in these boundaries came as a result of the Gadsden Purchase. The area included in that addition to the United States was annexted to the Territory of New Mexico by an Act of Congress August 4, 1854, and the Fifth Legislative Assembly of New Mexico made that region a part of Doña Ana County January 18, 1855.13

The Tenth Legislative Assembly created two new counties by an act passed February 1, 1860. One of these was Mora County which was bounded on the north and east by the New Mexico line; on the south by San Miguel County; and on the west by the ridge that divides the Taos Valley from Mora and Rayado. The other was Arizona County which included all of that part of Doña Ana County west of a north and south line passing through a point one mile east of the Overland Mail Station and Apache Cañon.14

San Juan County was created by the Eleventh Legislative Assembly January 12, 1861. It was bounded on the west by the California line; on the north by the New Mexico line; on the east by a line running north and south ten miles

101bid. 111bid. 12 New Mexico. Session Laws, 1851-52, p. 292. 13 New Mexico. Session Laws, 185455, p. 57. 14 New Mexico. Session Laws, 1859-60, p. 76. See Map No. 3.

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east of the town of Pagosa; and on the south by a line running east and west ten miles south of the southern most bend of the San Juan River. This county was abolished by the Twelfth Legislative Assembly, January 18, 1862.15

The same act that repealed the law creating San Juan County also abolished Arizona County and reannexed that area to Doña Ana County. The Thirteenth Legislative As

16 New Mexico. Session Laws, 186061, p. 17; New Mexico. Session Laws, 186162, p. 16.

sembly repealed the above act abolishing Arizona County, January 28, 1863. Shortly after, February 24, 1863, Arizona Territory was created by an Act of Congress.16

The creation of Colorado Territory resulted in the reduction of the size of Mora County by including in that territory all of New Mexico north of the 37th parallel of latitude.

The eastern boundary of Santa Fé County was redefined by an act of the Fourteenth Legislative Assembly passed February 3, 1864. The new line ran from the Punto de los Torreones to the Spring of San Miguel, thence to the Colorado corner at the rise of Cañon Blanco, and thence to Cibolo Spring.17

The southern boundary of Socorro County was redefined by the Seventeenth Legislative Assembly, January 31, 1867. The act provided that the line should run from a point one mile below Caballo Mountain in a direct line to the Arizona boundary.18

The Eighteenth Legislative Assembly redefined January 30, 1868 the boundary between Taos and Mora counties. This line ran from the first hill west of Mora Valley and east of the Jicarita, thence across the Vega del Estillero, thence through the Cañada del Raton to the foot of Oshá hill, and thence along the eastern base of the range in a northeasterly direction to the Colorado line.19

Grant County was created by the Eighteenth Legislative Assembly, January 30, 1868. It was bounded on the south by the Mexican line; on the west by the Arizona line; on the north by an east and west line running through the Ojo del Múerto; and on the east by a line drawn north and south between ranges seven and eight west.20

Lincoln County was organized by an act of the Legisla: tive Assembly, January 16, 1869 out of the eastern part of Socorro County. It was bounded on the west by a line

16 New Mexico. Session Laws, 186263, p. 30. 17 New Mexico. Session Laws, 186364, p. 88. 18New Mexico. Session Laws, 186667, p. 104. 19New Mexico. Session Laws, 186768, p. 106. 20New Mexico. Session Laws, 186768, p. 88.

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