The Monthly Magazine, Volume 30

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Sherwood, Gilbert and Piper, 1810 - Art

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Page 44 - We have more words than notions ; half a dozen words for the same thing : sometimes we put a new signification to an old word, as when we call a piece a gun. The word gun was in use in England for an engine to cast a thing from a man, long before there was any gunpowder found out.
Page 206 - Who God doth late and early pray More of his grace than goods to lend, And walks with man from day to day, As with a brother and a friend. 4 This man is freed from servile bands Of hope to rise, or fear to fall ; Lord of himself, though not of lands, And having nothing, yet hath all.
Page 400 - ... escape to Hamburgh ; but being discovered as he was looking out of a window in a house at Wapping, where he had concealed himself, he was seized by the mob and almost killed. He was finally lodged in the Tower by the populace, in order that he might be brought to justice ; but he died soon after, in consequence of the blows and bruises he had received. He had previously resided in Aldermanbury, and his body was privately interred by his family. The coffin was not opened ; and after public curiosity...
Page 431 - Your Committee are disposed to think from the result of the whole evidence, contradictory as it is, that the circumstances of the trade of this country, in the course of the last year, were such as to occasion a real fall of our exchanges with the Continent to a certain extent, and perhaps at one period almost as low as the limit fixed by the expense of remitting gold from hence to the respective markets.
Page 50 - Agricultural Mechanism, ; or a Display of the several Properties and Powers of the Vehicles, Implements and Machinery, connected with Husbandry.
Page 174 - Faint flashes of lightning-, attended sometimes by very distant thunder, are then seen to vibrate in quick succession. The clouds in that quarter become gradually more dense and black ; they also increase in bulk, and appear as if heaped on each other. The thunder, which at first was scarcely noticed, or heard only at long intervals, draws nearer by degrees, and becomes more frequent and tremendous. The blackness of the clouds increases until a great part of the heavens seems wrapped in the darkness...
Page 296 - French had taken the fortress of Kehl, levied contributions throughout the whole empire, and overrun the Milanese. Sardinia and Spain had declared against us. In vain I represented to the empire till I was tired, that the aggression of France ought to make it declare...
Page 136 - One particular more there is observable in relation to this our passage into France, that the vessel that brought us over had no sooner landed me, and I given her master a pass, for fear of meeting with any of our Jersey frigates, but the wind turned so happily for her, as to carry her directly for Pool without its being known that she had ever been upon the coast of France.
Page 287 - The lady speaks again in Welsh I understand thy kisses and thou mine, And that's a feeling disputation, But I will never be a truant, love, Till I have learned thy language, for thy tongue Makes Welsh as sweet as ditties highly penned, Sung by a fair queen in a summer's bower, With ravishing division, to her lute.
Page 164 - ... character was a miller, which occupation he followed with industry and attention till about the year 1766', when, by a strange species of insanity, he fancied himself Earl of Derby, King in Man, assumed those titles, neglected his business, and became very troublesome to many of his neighbours. In February 1767 he was arrested for a small debt, at the suit of the late Duke of Richmond, and was conveyed to the old gaol at Horsham, from which he was removed (the first prisoner after its completion...

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