The geography of the globe

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Page 248 - California, 851,598 square miles, or 545,012,720 acres; being an addition equal to more than onethird of all the territory owned by the United States before their acquisition ; and, including Oregon, nearly as great an extent of territory as the whole of Europe, Russia only excepted. The Mississippi, so lately the frontier of our country, is now only its centre. With the addition of the late acquisitions, the United States are now estimated to be nearly as large as the whole of Europe.
Page 248 - Within less than four years the annexation of Texas to the Union has been consummated; all conflicting title to the Oregon Territory south of the forty-ninth degree of north latitude, being all that was insisted on by any of my predecessors, has been adjusted; and New Mexico and Upper California have been acquired by treaty.
Page 320 - Rectify the globe for the latitude of the place, find the sun's place in the ecliptic and bring it to the brass meridian, and set the index of the hour circle to 12.
Page 315 - To find the sun's longitude (commonly called the sun's place in the ecliptic) and his declination. RULE. Look for the given day in the circle of months on the horizon, against which, in the circle of signs, are the sign and degree in which the sun is for. that day. Find the same sign and degree in the ecliptic on the surface of the globe ; bring the degree of the ecliptic, thus found, to that part of the...
Page 323 - ... then bring the given place to the meridian, and set the index to the given hour. Turn the globe till the index points to twelve at noon ; and the place exactly under the sun's declination on the brazen meridian will have the sun vertical at the given time.
Page 248 - ... the Oregon Territory south of the forty-ninth degree of north latitude, being all that was insisted on by any of my predecessors, has been adjusted; and New Mexico and Upper California have been acquired by treaty. The area of these several Territories, according to a report carefully prepared by the Commissioner of the General Land Office, from the most authentic information in his possession, and which is herewith transmitted, contains one million one hundred and ninetythree thousand and...
Page 53 - THAMES is the mighty king of all the British Rivers, superior to most in beauty, and to all in importance ; it takes its rise from a copious spring called Thames-head, about two miles south-west of Cireucester.

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