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restricted to ethics, 134, 139;
analytical, 131 ; opposed to
doubting, 123; his deviation
from original ground of Greek
thought, 231; free enquiry of,
291; new mode of thought, 182 ;
did not discourse on the All,
134 ; explanation by analogy,
265; maxim that virtue consists
in knowledge, 241; makes the
highest business of man know-
ing the Good, 248 ; few definite
opinions, 139; method, 120, 182,
240, 241; methodical pursuit of
knowledge, 106, 124, 169, 259,
372; narrowness of position of,
240; enunciated a new truth to
his contemporaries, 165; con-
vinced men of ignorance, 206 ;
spirit of, 246, 248; always
goes back to conceptions, 93,
120, 121, 48, 264, 292, 295 ;
overrated knowledge, 260; in-
troduced dialectic, 39; ideal-
ism of, 42; view of injuring
others, 170; theory of proof,
131; chief merit, 131 ; philo-

sophical greatness, 191
Socrates, Political views of, 228 ;

anti-republican sentiments, 168,
211; high ideas of the State, 167
, prejudice against, 205, 208
-, principles of, developed by
Plato, 49, 169
pupils of, 211, 236, 237, 370
relation to the Sophists, 55, 67
169, 187, 188, 189, 190, 203, 216,
-, natural science, 124 ; value of

geometry, 134; science foreign
to, 137, 172 ; relation of means

and ends, 137
- Theology of, an appendix to

ethics, 139; Reason of the world,
175; providence, 177 ; divine
element in man, 178

Writings of, 98
Socratic philosophy, 374; asks

Wbat things are in themselves,

40; different from what had
preceded, 39; developed by
Plato, 42, 391; leads to Idealism,
42 ; peculiar character of, 43;
imperfectly represented in So-
cratic Schools, 51; different
aspects of, 390, 389; scanty
notices of, in Aristotle, 101 ;
knowledge the centre of, 44,
106; disputes about the cha-
racter of, 117; moral views of,
45, 109; comprehensive cha-
racter of, 47; developed, 47;
subjective character of, 116;
two branches of, united by

Zeno, 253
Socratic School, a loose association

of admirers, 68; a branch of,
established by Euclid, 250; Cy-

renaic branch of, 337
Socratic Schools, imperfect at-

tempts to expand Socratic prin-
ciple, 50, 391; starting points
for Stoicism, 50, 1, 247; diverge
from Socrates, 248; disintegra-
tion of, 389; cover the same
ground as Socrates, 50; doctrine
of pleasure finds a place in, 160;
friendship defended by, 163;
founders of, 247; inconsisten-
cies of, 386; followers of So-
crates, 387; their importance,
389, 390; doctrine of oneness
of virtue and knowledge, 312 ;

independence of wants, 315
Socratic dialogues, 159, 184; doc-

trine of morals, 159; education,
243; Eros, 124, 126; Ethics,
240; idea of a ruler, 242;
knowledge of self, 121; method,
125; mode of teaching, 241;
search for conceptions, 48;
thoughts, 244 ; teaching, 159,
182, 245; view, 48; type of
virtue, 74; doctrine of virtue,
140; conception of virtue, 147;
circle, 327 ; traits in Aristippus,
372

SOC

Socratic teaching, various ele-

ments in, 391
Solon's constitution re-established,

31
Sophist, Socrates taken for a, 210;

meaning of the term, 190; An-
tisthenes in the capacity of,

285
* Sophistes,' the, of Plato, 266
Sophistic tendencies, practical

effect of, 2; teaching, 2, 114 ;
enquiries, 2 ; influence of,

views, 311, 338
Sophists call everything in ques-

tion, 1; Euripides related to
the better, 16; rationalising
spirit of, 26 ; avow selfish prin-
ciples, 28; introduce systematic
education, 55,; public teachers,
67; little dependence placed in,
by Socrates, 66; dogmatism
overthrown by, 112 ; believe
real knowledge impossible, 112;,
meet the want of the age with
skill, i13; recognise unsatis-
factoriness of older culture, 114;
caprice of, 116, 117; destroyed
the contending views of natural
philosophers, 124; ignorance
their leading thought, 124; con-
tests with, 133; made education
a necessary for statesmen, 169;
travellers, 4; impart an electri-
cal shock to their age, 186 ; their
relation to Socrates, 187, 188,
333; moral teaching of older,
190; draw philosophy away
from nature to morals, 191 ;
failure of, 191 ; their hatred of
Socrates, 203 ; did not take part
in his accusation, 203, 205 ;
small political influence of, 204 ;
rhetorical display of, 216 ;
Schools of, 218; pernicious in-
fluence of, 218; corrupters of
the people, 218; arguments of,
265; hold that every object can
only be called by its own pecu-

STO
liar name, 296; required pay-
ment for instruction, 339 ; views
on knowledge and pleasure, 387;

diversities of, 387
Sophistry, a narrower limitation

of Socrates' teaching, 388; ten-

dency to, 387
Sophocles, illustrating problem of

philosophy, 6, 10; difference

between, and Æschylus, 12
Sophroniscus, father of Socrates,

54, 1
Sorites, the, of Megarians, 266 ;

attributed to Eubulides, 268
Sparta, 230
Spartan education, 243
Spartans, Cyrus the friend of,

230
State, the, views of Socrates on,

165-168
Stilpo, a Megarian philosopher,

260; friend of Thrasymachus,
252; placed highest good in
apathy, 277; his captiousness,
277; rejects every combination
of subject and predicate, 276;
denies that general conceptions
can be applied to individual
things, 260; an object of won-
der to his contemporaries, 253 ;
learnt Cynicism from Diogenes,
253; united teaching of Mega-
rian and Cynic Schools, 284 ;

his free views on religion, 283
Stoa, Stilpo the precursor of, 253,

284; took the Cynic principles,

335, 390
Stobæus, quotes the words of Dio-

genes, 308

Stoicism, an outcome of Cynicism,

50
Stoics, hold a standard of know-

ledge to be possible, 45; their
apathy, 46, 117; later philoso-
phers, 105; consider Socrates
the inaugurator of a new philo-
sophical epoch, 100; declare
personal conviction the standard

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re-

Tartarus, received notions

specting, 24

Teiresias explains birth of Bacchus, WISDOM and Folly, Cynic

ideas of, 313
Wolf, 215
Worship of God, 175

XANT, 166 E, wife of Socrates,

17
Test science of truth, 44
Theætetus,' the, 125
Thebans, Simmias and Cebes two,

246
Theodorus called the Atheist, a

pupil of Aristippus, 342, 376 ;
not altogether satisfied with
Aristippus, 379; his pupils Bio
and Euemerus, 343, 378; won-
tonly attacks popular faith, 367;
considers pleasure and pain
neither good nor bad in them-

selves, 379, 383
Thessaly, visited by Sophists, 4
Thessalian legend of Poseidon, 26
Thrasybulus, 211, 225
Thrasymachus of Corinth, 251,

252
Thucydides illustrating the pro-

blem of philosophy, 27; a mat-

ter-of-fact writer, 27
Timæus of Plato, 137
Timon, 255
Titan in Æschylus, 9, 13
Tragedians, illustrating the philo-

sophy of, 4

61, 166
Xenophanes, his doctrine of the

One, 278
Xenophon, 179, 239; a pupil of

Socrates, 212 ; his account of
Socrates, 72, 73, 76, 89, 91, 137,
170, 171, 181, 182, 184, 185, 155,
116, 159, 161 ; of the dalubvlov,
84; his Memorabilia,' 72, 75,
78, 102, 132, 167, 183 ; objection
raised by, 80; Symposium, 79,
74; and Plato as authorities, 98,
99, 100, 101, 102; writings of,
98; supposed popular philoso-
phy of, 99; description chal-
lenged, 135, 183; true, 161, 181;
on nature, 134; agreement with
Plato and Aristotle, 181; vindi-
cated against Schleiermacher,
183; Apology of, 205 ; reply to
charges, 221 ; sketch of an ideal
ruler, 243

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