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“ been the bane of every rising genius of " the present age.

Hence life in general (for the exceptions are exceeding few) is “ thrown away in indolence and sloth. In “ this deadly lethargy, or even any brighter " intervals of the disease, our faint endea“ vours aim at nothing but pleasure and “ empty ostentation, too weak and languid “ for those high acquisitions, which take “ their rise from noble emulation, and end “ in real advantage and substantial glory.”

Here perhaps it may be proper to drop this subject, and pursue our business. ? We

come

? We come now to the Passions, &c.—] The learned world ought certainly to be condoled with, on the great loss they have sustained in Longinus's Treatise on the Passions. The excellence of this on the Sublime, makes us regret the more the loss of the other, and inspires us with deep resentments of the irreparable depredations committed on learning and the valuable productions of antiquity, by Goths, and monks, and time. There, in all probability, we should have beheld the secret springs and movements of the soul disclosed to view. There we should have been taught, if rule and observation in this case can teach, to elevate an audience into joy, or melt them into tears. There we should have learned, if ever, to work upon every passion, to put every heart, every pulse in emotion. At present we must sit down contented under the loss, and be satisfied with this invaluable Piece on the Sublime,

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come now to the Passions, an account of which I have promised before in a distinct treatise, since they not only constitute the ornaments and beauties of discourse, but (if I am not mistaken) have a great share in the SUBLIME.

which with much hazard has escaped a wreck, and gained a port, though not undamaged. Great indeed are the commendations which the judicious bestow upon it, but not in the least disproportioned to its merit. For in it are treasured up the laws and precepts of fine writing, and a fine taste. Here are the rules which polish the writer's invention, and refine the critic's judgment. Here is an object proposed at once for our admiration and imitation.

Dr. Pearce's advice will be a seasonable conclusion, “ Read over very frequently this golden treatise (which “ deserves not only to be read but imitated), that you

may hence understand, not only how the best authors “ have written, but learn yourself to become an author " of the first rank. Read it therefore and digest it, - then take up your pen in the words of Virgil's Nisus;

-Aliquid jamdudum invadere magnum
Mens agitat mihi, nec placidâ contenta quiete est.

FUNIS.

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Hecatæus

151
Hegesias

44
Herodotus 52, 104, 138,

149, 156, 162, 190, 202
Hesiod

67, 105

C. WHITTINGHAM, Printer,
Dean Sueet, Fetter Lane, London,

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