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« WHAT IS THIS?".

593

OH, PRAY HIM BY HIS MERCY, FOR 'TIS TUE

EBB OF TIDE!". .

. 601

"HE HAS DONE SOMETHING WRONG, BUT NOT

THIS!' CRIED NELLY, SINKING ON HER KNEES 603

DIM-EYED, WITH PALLID CHEEK AND CHESTNUT

HAIR, SPARSE SILVERED O'ER HIS SHOULDERS,

GARBED IN GREY

617

AT LENGTH TRE TRAIN WAS OFF"

625

DOROTHEA AND

“ TRENT" TAKING THE ICE 633

ORIGEN ON THE STEPS OF THE TEMPLE OF SERAPIS,
AT ALEXANDRIA .

To juce Puge 702

"I RECKON YOU AINT USED TO THIS SORT OF

THING”

041

“SO, THEN, DOLLY IS YOUR ONLY COMPANION 649

" TURNING HER BACK TO HIM, SHE FELT IN HIS

WAISTCOAT-POCKET FOR THE WATCH”

657

“MABEL, DEAR—WHY, IT IS THE WILL

665

"HE SUDDENLY PROPOSED BY LETTER

673

IN THE FACE OF THE WIND I FOUGHT MY WAY 681

“ IT WAS A LOVELY INFANT".

689

FORT ENTERPRISE

. 697

THE CHILD CYPRIAN FRIGHTENED BY THE CRY OF,

“DEATH TO THE CHRISTIANS, " &c. To face Page 764

HARRY PALMER FORGOT HIMSELF, AND STRUCK

THE SLANDERER A VIOLENT BLOW"

705

"SOMEBODY WE KNOW NOTHING ABOUT, OF

COURSE,' SAID Miss TYRAWLEY, SLIGHTINGLY" 713

“HE HELD OUT HIS HAND : HORACE EDEN TOOK

IT AND BURST INTO TEARS

721

" THE SOUND OF THE SIMPLE LAYS THOU HAST

WARBLED AND LOVED IN CHILDHOOD

729

“NELLY STRETCHED OUT HER HANDS AND DREW

HER TO THE FIRE, SAYING SIMPLY, COME'” 737

RICHARDSON IN THE CRESCENT OF WHITE WOLVES 745

"MR. DALRYMPLE HAD TO CARRY OFF HIS JELLY

IN A KIND OF DEFEAT

• 753

PERRAULT PRESENTING MEAT TO THE OFFICERS 761

“ HE COVERED HER HAND WITH KISSES

“ AND THE STRANGE STILLNESS SOOTHED US MORE

AND MORE AS ON WE WANDERED SLOWLY" . 777

DO YOU WISH TO MAKE HER SUCH AS THESE ?" 785

SAMANDRÉ TELLING FRANKLIN THAT CRÉDIT AND

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WHITE MAY

505

“ HE GREETED MR. DALRYMPLE WITH AN INSOLEXT

STARE

· 513

“THE PARENT THRUSH WITH PITEOUS CALL BE-

WAILS HER BROOD'S DISASTROUS FATE 521
“ HE WILL BRING DOWN MY GREY HAIRS WITH
SORROW TO TEE GRAVE

529
“I TOOK FOUR HALF-CROWNS OUT OF MY TILL
AND PLACED THEM ON THE COUNTER

537
"THESE TWO LOVING WOMEN WEPT IN EACH
OTHER'S ARMS”

545
“ THOU MAD'ST IRISH BRAVE AND SCOT IN THEIR
DUTY FALTER NOT

553
THE ISLAND OF ASCENSION

557
««WOULDN'T HE TELL HIMSELF ?' SAID MR.

JOBSON, WITH A DIABOLICAL SNEER · 561
THE QUIVER COT" IN THE HOSPITAL FOR SICK
CHILDREN, GREAT ORMOND STREET

568
“ON THE BRIDGE-RAIL SHE LEANS, AND GAZES

DOWN INTO THE LOCK : WHAT SEES SIE?”.569

STAIRCASE OF CROMWELL HOUSE, HIGHGATE

To face Page 639

""No; I AM NOT TIRED ; I AM NOT COLD,'
REPLIED PATRICIA"

577
~ GRANDLY ECHOED THE ROUNDHEAD HYMN ALONG
THE BLEAK HILL-SIDE

585

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LE VAILLANT HAD DROPPED DOWN .. 793

“ HOW DID YOU COME INTO POSSESSION OF THESE ?" 801

CHISWICK CHURCH

809

“IT WAS NELLY AT THE DOOR, WITH AWED,

WHITE FACE,

AND THE MESSAGE,

COME

QUICKLY'

. 817

“ SUXLIT SLOPES WITH SHADY PURPLE TINGES" , 825

1

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CHAPTER 1.-WHAT HAS BECOME OF HER? he took a house, he must marry." He thought he was beginning the world with no very great

80, as he stood with his back to the fire, in- resources at his command. dulging in a kind of reverie. He had lately come If you cross the market-place, you will come to a to East Bramley, to set up as a lawyer. In fact, modest-looking door, which stands open all day to

212

VOL. v.

own.

seen.

2

admit clients. Here you can read his name and pro- out a sixpence in the world—without even connecfession, engraven in brass letters—“Mr. Vincent, tions !_daily governess to the children of the iron. solicitor.

monger just opposite. A young lawyer, with good introductions, and He had seen Ruth Smith in her own house, di. with plenty of address, was sure to be welcome in vested of the well-worn straw hat, and the shawl the small and rather dull town of East Bramley. that had done service many a season. He knew the Horace Vincent had no reason to complain of his soft dovelike eyes had a touch of innocent wonder reception; but he looked forward to happier times in them that was irresistible; that her complexion than these-times when he should be able to quit was fair as a lily; that her hair was a rich auburn, Mrs. Perkins's lodgings, and have a house of his and had a wave in it that was singularly beautiful;

that she wore it coiled round her head in a way that There was a house to let a few doors off. It was was, to say the least of it, classical. Not that she just the place for him, if he could only afford the knew, poor child, what the word classics meant. She rent; but the utmost stretch his resources would had ground over the sentence often enough in the allow—nay, his whole income—was £150 a year. schoolroom, where she was daily governess to the Besides, if he took a house, he must marry.

ironmonger's children—"Homer, the prince of poets," As if by an involuntary movement, he raised his &c. &c.; but this was all. eyes to the window. No; there was nothing to be He knew the style of her home. He had done a

The inhabitants of the market - place were little business for the grim aunt with whom she taking their tea. Early hours were observed in lived. He knew that Ruth was dependent on her, East Bramley. Besides, of all the unsuitable per- and had neither parent nor friend. The loneliness sons in the world

and precarious nature of her position had interested No—no; he could not begin life by making a him from the first; for the grim aunt had sunk her mistake like that. He must have a connection, money in an annuity. Horace had tried to shake position, money, and so forth.

this resolve of hers. He represented to her the And yet his eye fell again on the window.

needs of her orphan niece. Suppose he made a bold stroke, and asked Miss “When it should please Providence to remove the Easton to marry him. She was as rich as could be, only protector she had, what will become of her?” he and had the best position in the town and county; had said. and she was a great beauty. There was no one con- She

may

do as she does now-earn her bread,” sidered worthy to be compared to her.

was the reply, spoken without much feeling But-his eye fell again on the window-no; he did Since then, Horace had more tenderness for Ruth not think--desirable as the match might be—that Smith than ever. He had been from home a week he cusuld ever make an attempt in the direction of on business—he had only returned the day beforethe Eastons. Th re was a rich widow who had been and he had missed Ruth Smith for the first time. very kind to him ; lui! ed, no one could be kinder. Tired as he was, and perplexed with other cares, he She had told him her huue? was to be his home. did not forget to look out for her. But there was He might go and drink tea with her this very night. no Ruth. He could not think what was the reason.

But that was not the subject-m. ter just now. It was neither Easter, nor Christmas, nor any other A sweet, gentle girl, who would sit sew. ? opposite holiday. Could she be ill ? to him, and be the very embodiment of a mestic All his thoughts and speculations began to drift felicity; who would keep his buttons stitched on, in that direction. Like a rapid current, they bore and regulate his grocery, and not let him 19 him farther from Miss Easton and the rich widow pillaged; who would be kind and affectionate, and a han ever; and farther, the East Bramley people companion. He hesitated, in a curious way, about would say, from his own interests. Be that as it the last clause of the sentence. And did he know may, An changed his tactics. He would take his any such person? He had seen one twice every tea at home, and he rang for Mrs. Perkins. When day since he had lived in Mrs. Perkins's apartment. he had finished tea, he would go out—where, he had A little figure had gone tripping by morning and not quite decided. evening, and a sweet face, with a pair of dovelike As the landlady set down his solitary cup and eyes, had been shyly turned to give him a glance. saucer, he began to ask her a fer questions. He wondered often what he was thinking about to “Anything stirring in the tow!, Mrs. Perkins, dwell so much upon the fact, and what there was, since I went away?” when he came seriously to discuss the point, that “Not much, sir. There's been a wedding, and a was so interesting about her.

funeral, close by here, sir.” And how could he, who was on his preferment, “Whose wedding ?” asked Horace, briskly. and with the world's tardy favour to be wrung from No one, sir, as you know. It was at the conher-how could he suppose for a moment—that he fectioner's shop at the corner ; the young lady that could marry Ruth Smith ? Nonsense! A girl with-waited behind the counter

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“Oh,” said Horace, in a very indifferent tone; It would never do for him, of course. Just he “and what about the funeral ?”

most disastrous step he could take. He wished ie “I don't know as you'd mind much about that, were rich, and could afford it; then he would transeither. It was the old lady as lived in High plant the poor little flower from where the rough Street

winds would buffet it almost to death. But, con. High Street P” asked Horace, quickly.

sense! How could he marry, in his sober senses? Yes, sir. It is not likely you should know her. He was not thinking of marrying-he said it 'o A Miss Smith lived with her; the girl that goes by himself, peevishly—but he might behave like a here to her teaching."

Christian man and a gentleman. He might step in, Horace turned very pale indeed. Has anything and see the poor thing in her affliction. Half an happened to Miss Smith ?” he asked, hastily. hour would not be ill spent in so doing. And he

“No, sir; oh no. It's the old lady that is dead." would set East Bramley at defiance. “ When?" asked Horace, in a tone of awe.

"The very day you went, sir. She died quite sudden in her chair."

CHAPTER II. And Ruth-Miss Smith, I mean?” exclaimed Horace, aghast at the intelligence.

OFFICE work had ended for the day. His time was “Well, poor thing, I don't know much about her. his own, and he walked briskly along, rather in a She was at the funeral, I suppose. There wasn't any state of excitement, if the truth were to be told. He other mourners followed except herself and the wanted to see Ruth very much indeed. doctor.”

His look of condolence was thrown away on the How very distressing !” exclaimed Horace, almost hard-featured woman who opened the door, and who in tears.

was in mourning for her mistress. “You see, sir, she wasn't much liked in the place.” “Oh, she is very well, thank you, sir,” replied this

“Who wasn't?” interposed the lodger, sharply, individual, answering his question about Ruth, to and almost angrily.

which question the look of condolence belonged. The old lady, sir. She was a very odd sort of “Miss Smith must have suffered greatly,” said person, and no one ever saw much of her.

When | Horace, in the same feeling tone, as he stepped into folks don't make friends, of course they aint to be the passage. had just for the asking," added Mrs. Perkins, logi- The woman made no reply, only she looked a trifle cally.

harder than before. Unfortunately, the heart of the " And where is the poor girl now p" asked Horace, young lawyer grew softer every moment.

He went feelingly, and with anxiety.

into the little room where Ruth was sitting in her “At her own home, sir, for the present. She will desolation. It looked rather forlorn and neglected, have to leave, of course; but the funeral only took but he did not dwell on this fact in the least. His place yesterday."

whole attention was fixed on Ruth. She was seated “Dear me! that all this should have happenea in at the table, the newspaper spread open before her. one week!”

Her black dress made her look fairer than ever. He did not say it before Mrs. Perkins. She had Her hair had its usual lovely wave; her eyes were left the room, for the first floor lodger was back, and filled with tears. wanted his dinner.

The tears were what upset Horace's philosophy in Horace was alone. “Poor Ruth !--poor girl! the very beginning. He had never bargained with What a terrible position! What will become of her ?” himself to be balf so tender as he was when he took

It did not all at once come into his mind that her hand and said—“Dear Miss Smith, I only knew he should go and comfort her, or that there was any last night. I should have come long before this, if absolute necessity for it.

I had." An old servant was in the house, and the wife of He never forgot the look of joy that came into her the ironmonger had been there. So Mrs. Perkins face. “Oh, I knew you would! I felt sure you told him, as she went.

would !” exclaimed she, weeping and smiling toHis acquaintance with Ruth was very slight in- gether. “I wanted so to see you before I went.” deed. She had seldom spoken before him, except “Went! Where are you going ?” asked Horace, to say yes or no. Perhaps his visit might alarm quickly. her. It was sure to be talked of in the gossiping "I am going to answer an advertisement for a town of East Bramley. Sure and certain to be governess. I have no home now my aunt is dead." misrepresented. Why should he care for that? He There was something very touching in the girl's was deeply sorry for the girl. How young, and utter friendlessness, and yet the patient submission innocent, and friendless she was! What a sad life with which she said the words. was before her! He knew she would not have a "Why can't you stay in East Bramley ?” asked farthing in the world !

Horace, hastily.

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