Familiar Quotations: Being an Attempt to Trace to Their Source : Passages and Phrases in Common Use

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Little, Brown, 1870 - Quotations - 778 pages
 

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Page 511 - Praise the Power that hath made and preserved us a nation ! Then conquer we must, when our cause it is just, And this be our motto, " In God is our trust " ; And the star-spangled banner, O long may it wave O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave ! The Star-spangled Banner.
Page 420 - The sounding cataract Haunted me like a passion : the tall rock, The mountain, and the deep and gloomy wood, Their colours and their forms, were then to me An appetite ; a feeling and a love, That had no need of a remoter charm By thoughts supplied, nor any interest Unborrowed from the eye.
Page 241 - ISAAC NEWTON. 1642-1727. I do not know what I may appear to the world, but to myself I seem to have been only like a boy playing on the sea-shore, and diverting myself in now and then finding a smoother pebble, or a prettier shell than ordinar)', whilst the great ocean of truth lay all
Page 101 - Act iv. Sc. 3. Give sorrow words ; the grief that does not speak Whispers the o'er-fraught heart, and bids it break. Act iv. Sc. 3. What, all my pretty chickens, and their dam, At one fell swoop ? Act iv. Sc. 3. I cannot but remember such things were, That were most precious to me. Act iv.
Page 108 - entrance to a quarrel ; but, being in, Bear 't that the opposed may beware of thee. Give every man thine ear, but few thy voice ; Take each man's censure, but reserve thy judgment. Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy, But not express'd in fancy ; rich, not gaudy : For the apparel oft proclaims the man.
Page 416 - She dwelt among the untrodden ways Beside the springs of Dove, A maid whom there were none to praise And very few to love. She dwelt among the untrodden ways. A violet by a mossy stone Half hidden from the eye ! Fair as a star, when only one Is shining in the sky. ibid.
Page 482 - 5 When my eyes shall be turned to behold for the last time the sun in heaven, may I not see him shining on the broken and dishonored fragments of a once glorious Union ; on States dissevered, discordant, belligerent; on a land rent with civil feuds, or drenched, it may be, in fraternal blood. Second Speech on
Page 56 - O, who can hold a fire in his hand By thinking on the frosty Caucasus ? Or cloy the hungry edge of appetite By bare imagination of a feast ? Or wallow naked in December snow, By thinking on fantastic Summer's heat. O, no ! the apprehension of the good Gives but the greater feeling to the worse.
Page 134 - 1 have done the State some service, and they know it ; No more of that. I pray you, in your letters, When you shall these unlucky deeds relate, Speak of me as I am ; nothing extenuate, Nor set down aught in malice : then, must you speak Of one that lov'd, not wisely, but too well
Page 50 - TWELFTH NIGHT. If music be the food of love, play on ; Give me excess of it, that, surfeiting, The appetite may sicken, and so die. That strain again ; it had a dying fall : O, it came o'er my ear like the sweet south, That breathes upon a bank of violets, Stealing and giving odour. Act i.

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