Tables Meteorological and Physical Prepared for the Smithsonian Institution

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Page 49 - T', the temperature of the barometer, ' t', the temperature of the air. Represent by s the height of the lower station above the level of the sea, by L the latitude of the place, and by h the observed height h' reduced to the temperature T.
Page 62 - TABLE GIVING THE CORRECTION TO BE APPLIED TO ENGLISH BAROMETERS, WITH BRASS SCALES. EXTENDING FROM THE CISTERN TO THE TOP OF THE MERCURIAL COLUMN, FOR REDUCING THE OBSERVATIONS TO THIRTY-TWO DEGREES FAHRENHEIT.
Page 74 - Forces due to t and t', we have = ^~ = 73.4, Relative Humidity in Hundredths. The following Table VIII. gives, in hundredths, the fraction of saturation, or Relative Humidity, corresponding to each degree of f, or of the temperature of the air, from 0° to 104° ; and for every half degree of t — t', or of the difference between the temperature of the air and of the dew-point, from 0.°5 to 24.°5. Regnault's Table of Elastic Forces of Vapor, reduced to English measures, has been used in the computation....
Page 142 - X 4.56 = 4Ğr>.49, the weight of vapor required. TABLE XVII. FOR COMPARING THE WEIGHT OF A CUBIC FOOT OF DRY AND OF SATURATED AIR. THIS table is composed of two tables found in the Greenwich Meteorological Observations for 1842, pages xlvi. and li. ; the first containing the weight of a cubic foot of dry air, under a barometric pressure of 30 inches, at temperatures between 0° and 90° F. ; the other giving the weight of a cubic foot of saturated air under the same barometric pressure and temperature,...
Page 123 - WITH BRASS SCALES, EXTENDING FROM THE CISTERN TO THE TOP OF THE MERCURIAL COLUMN; CALCULATED FROM 240 TO 345 LINES, OR FROM 23 INCHES 4 LINES TO 28 INCHES 9 LINES.
Page 53 - Correction due to T — T', or the Difference of the Temperatures of the Barometers at the two Stations. This Correction is Negative when the Temperature at the Upper Station is lowest, and vice vers I. ! T — T'. l Correction. T — T'. Correction. T — T'.
Page 50 - We then calculate the correction a.— '- — -- — for the temperature of the air, by multiplying the nine hundredth part of a by the sum of the temperatures t and t', diminished by 64.
Page 72 - GLASS SCALES, TO THE FREEZING POINT. IN most of the common barometers the scale is engraved upon a short plate of brass, or of ivory, fixed upon the wooden frame of the instrument. In such a case, the compound expansion of the two substances can only be guessed at, and the correction to be applied to the observations for reducing them to the freezing point cnnnot be determined with precision.
Page 35 - X 60158.6 for every hundredth of an inch, from 12 to 31 inches in the barometer, together with the value of the additional thousandths, in a separate column. These values have been diminished by a constant, which does not alter the difference required. Table II. gives the correction 2.343 feet X (r — r1) for the difference of the temperatures of the barometers at the two stations, or f — r'.
Page 7 - TO CONVERT SIDEREAL TIME INTO PARTS OF THE EQUATOR IN ARC, OR TO CONVERT TIME INTO TERRESTRIAL LONGITUDE IN ARC.

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