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The Second Part will contain a selection of Oratorical, Philosophical and Miscellaneous Passages: and I hope to be able shortly to provide a selection of easy passages for Greek Prose Composition arranged on the same principle.

Suggestions and corrections will be gratefully received.

J. E. NIXON. KING'S COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE,

Jan. 1874.

PREFACE TO SECOND EDITION.

In the Second Edition some corrections and additions have been made in the Notes on Idioms, and some easier pieces--translations, or adaptations of letters in one or two cases borrowed from Melmoth's Pliny)—added at the end, with a general Index. A few references have also been added to Nägelsbach's Stilistik, a book invaluable for its copious examples, which I have lately compared throughout, and regret that I did not consult it for my first edition. It can and should be used even by those who have little or no knowledge of German, for the purposes of illustration. The numeration of the Notes, the numerical references, the numbering and paging of the Extracts have been left unaltered, to avoid confusion in the case of classes using both editions. It is hoped that the improved side-summaries of the notes will help to make the small numerical references more practically useful.

KING'S COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE.

May, 1876.

Translations of some of the passages have been printed in such a way as to be readily distributable to a class. Application for these should be made direct to the Author:

CONTENTS OF NOTES ON IDIOMS.

PAGES

Order and connexion of ideas, &$ 149

xi-xvii

Compound terms, § 2.

Qualifying words and clauses, $ 3.

Emphasis and antithesis, § 4 (see also 8 8).

Chronological order, ß 4 (see also $ 9 y).

Relatives, their position, $ 5.

Change of subject, § 6.

Passives replaced by Actives, $ 7.

Co-ordinate by subordinate clauses and period, § 9.
Substantives, SS 10—14

xvii-XX

Repetition of subject and object, $ 10.

Pleonasms, $ 11.

Substantives replaced by verbs, &c., § 12.

Abstract by concrete expressions, $ 13.

Realism, § 14.

Pronouns, ss 15–17

XX-XXii
Definite and indefinite Articles.

Is, hic, ille, iste, idem, ipse, aliquis, &c.

Adjectives, SS 18–24

Attributives or epithets, § 18.

Participial, § 18 y.

Pleonasms, $ 19.

As clauses, § 20.

Replaced by adverbs, &c., SS 21, 22.
As predicates, $ 23.

Interchange of positives, comparatives, and superlatives, $ 24.

Participles, $$ 25, 26

xxvi-xxvüi

Usage of Present active and passive.

of Past

xxiii-XXV

TABLE OF HISTORICAL AND EPISTOLARY

EXTRACTS.

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The Story of Cincinnatus

..Livy, Arnold. Arminius defeats Cæcina

.Tacitus. Defeat of Varus

Creasy. Insurrection at Syracuse

.Livy, Arnold. Meeting of Arminius and his Brother .Tacitus, Creasy. Archimedes' defence of Syracuse

..Livy, Arnold. Excitement at Rome before the Battle of Metaurus Livy, Creasy. Ditto after the Battle

.Livy, Arnold. News of the Battle of Bedriacum

.Tacitus. the Boyne

.Macaulay. Description of Jerusalem

.Tacitus. Marcellus at Syracuse...

...Livy. Titus at Jerusalem.

Milman. Murmurs of Soldiery .. .

(oratio cbliqua)...... Tacitus, Prescott. Exhortations to Army.

ditto ....

Tacitus, Prescott. Mutinous behaviour of Troops, ditto ..Livy, Robertson. Siege of Tyre

Curtius, Grote, Unsuccessful attempt to storm a town

..Livy, Mahor. Battles of Thrasymenus and Nieuport ...Livy, Motley. Sack of Cremona and Rome

.Tacitus, Robertson Sieges of Rome and Paris

Livy, Motley. Description of Battle-fields

.Tacitus, Alison. Funerals of Germanicus and Queen Mary ... Tacitus, Macaulay. Characters of Augustus and Julius Cæsar

Suetonius. Mary Queen of Scots and Charles Edward Stuart.

Robertson, Mahon. Cato and Catiline

.Livy, Sallust. Danton, Pitt, Robespierre..

13.

14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19.

20.

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21.

..Brougham. Agricola, Galba, Claudius .Tacitus, Suetonius. Washington, Louis Napoleon...Jefferson, Kinglake.

99

22.

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Table of Historical and Epistolary Extracts.

23.

24.

25.

Preface to History ............ Sallust, Tacitus, Thiers, Macaulay.
Great Fire at Rome and London...Livy, Tacitus, Hume, Evelyn.
Death of Pliny the Elder......

.Pliny, Merivale.
Eruption of Vesuvius-Earthquakes

.Pliny. Earthquake of Lisbon

.Davy.

26.

27-30. Letters on Epistolary Style, &c.
31–32. Descriptive Letters.
33–35. Letters on mode of life, &c.
36–37. Letters of Condolence.
38–41. Family Letters.
42—55. Familiar and Playful Letters.
55—60. Adaptations and translations.
(Cicero, Pliny, Pope, Swift, Lamb, Sidney Smith, Cowper,

Leigh Hunt, &c.)

Numbers in brackets are used for the purpose of reference to distin. guish the English from the Latin Extracts.

The Extracts which will be found most easy for translation with the help of their parallels are Nos. (1-7), (13), (25), (55—60), and also such simple letters as (28), (31), (37), (38).

'The Passages most useful for practice of Oratio Obliqua are Nos. (4), (6—8), (10—12); and (14), (16a), (25), (37a, b), (47a), may also conveniently be adapted for the same purpose.

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