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Harvey, Esq., and planted in his garden at Catton, near Norwich, about sixty years ago, along with some plants of the Dutch Mignonne Apple, both sorts of which are now growing

Sect. III. – Autumnal. Round-fruited. 41. Aston Town. Hooker, Pom. Lond. t. 18. Aston Town. Pom. Mag. t. 139.

Fruit middle-sized, of a roundish turbinate figure, somewhat like a narrow-crowned Crasanne, but more tapered next the stalk, about two inches and a half deep, and nearly the same in diameter. Eye small, shallow. Stalk one inch and a half long, slender, protruding in a direct line from the base, and inserted with but little cavity. Skin pale greenish white, rugose, covered with numerous grey russetty specks, like the Crasanne. Flesh tender, buttery, and full of a most excellent saccharine perfumed juice.

Ripe the beginning and to the end of October.

Branches long and rather slender, flagelliform, with a manner of growing peculiar to this tree, that is, a tendency to twist round in growing upwards ; so that at a distance, when planted as a standard, it may be distinguished from every other sort.

This most excellent Pear is at present but little known in many parts of England. It is, however, well known, and extensively cultivated in the north-west counties of Lancaster, Chester, and Hereford. In the latter county, particularly at Shobden Court, and at Garnstone, it is grown in abundance, both on walls, espaliers, and on open standards, where it furnishes constant crops of most perfect fruit, fully equal in goodness to those of the Crasanne, which it somewhat resembles. It was raised many years ago at Aston, in Cheshire.

42. AUTUMN BERGAMOT. Miller, No. 32. Pom. Mag. t. 120.

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Hort. Soc. Cat. No. 52. Ib.. Common Bergamot,

No. 62. according to the York Bergamot, Pom. Mag.

Fruit small, approaching the middle size, depressed, globular, about two inches and a half deep, and the same in diameter. Eye small, open, in a regular-formed shallow depression. Stalk short and thick, inserted in a rather wide funnel-shaped cavity. Skin rather rough, yellowish green; but of a dull brown on the sunny side, and full of grey scabrous specks. Flesh whitish, melting, a little gritty next the core, with a sugary and richly perfumed juice.

Ripe the beginning of October, and good till the end. This succeeds well on both the Pear and the Quince.

I have not quoted Duhamel, as he has given two figures of his Bergamotte d'Automne, neither of which appears to correspond with our Autumn Bergamot.

It is one of the best Pears of the season, and it is also one of the most ancient, supposed to have been in this country ever since the time of Julius Cæsar.

43. BELLE ET BONNE. Pom. Mag. t. 118. Belle et Bonne. Baumann's Catalogue.

Schöne und Gute. Taschenbuch, p. 431. according to the Pom. Mag.

Fruit large, globular, depressed, about three inches deep, and three inches and a half in diameter. Eye large, open, with short crumpled segments of the calyx, in a shallow and rather uneven depression. Stalk one inch and a half long, curved, slightly inserted in a narrow cavity. Skin pale yellow, mixed with green, a little russetty on the sunny side, and slightly tinged with a few faint streaks of pale brown. Flesh white, a little gritty, but soft and mellow, with a saccharine, rich, and perfumed juice.

Ripe the end of September, and is good for two or three weeks.

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It succeeds well on both the Pear and the Quince.

This very valuable variety was introduced by the Horticultural Society in 1826, to whom it was sent by Messrs. Baumann, of Bollwiller. It has been cultivated here under the erroneous names of Charles d'Autriche and Belle de Bruxelles, both of which are different fruits from this.

44. BERGAMOTTE CADETTE. Duhamel, No. 54. t. 44. f. 2.

Poire de Cadette. 16.

Fruit middle-sized, roundish, or sub-turbinate, about two inches and three quarters deep, and the same in diameter. Eye small, almost closed, very little sunk in a somewhat flatted apex. Stalk an inch long, thick, inserted in a rather shallow angular cavity. Skin smooth, yellowish, and shaded with red on the sunny side. Flesh and Juice excellent, little inferior to any of the other Bergamots.

Ripe the beginning and middle of October.
This succeeds on both the Pear and the Quince.
45. Bezy D'HERI. Duhamel, No. 23.
Besideri. Miller, No. 45.

Fruit middle-sized, of a somewhat roundish ovate figure, about two inches and a half long, and two inches and a quarter in diameter. Eye open, flat. Stalk one inch and a quarter long, slender, curved. Skin smooth, pale green, inclining to yellow, slightly tinged with red on the sunny side. Flesh rather dry, and but indifferent for eating, but it bakes well.

In use October and November.

This Pear takes its name from Heri, a forest in Bretagne, between Rennes and Nantes, where it was found in a wild state.

46. BEZY DE LA MOTTE. Duhamel, 82. t. 44. f. 5. Pom. Mag. t. 143. Hort. Trans. Vol. 5. p. 132. t, 2. f. 2.

Hort. Soc. Cat. No. 36.

Bein Armudi,

Of some Collections, acBeurré blanc de Jersey, cording to the Pom. Mag.

Fruit pretty large, of a roundish turbinate figure, about three inches deep, and the same in diameter. Eye small, open, sunk in a round shallow basin. Stalk an inch long, bent, strong, and inserted in a small but widish cavity. Skin yellowish green, covered with grey russetty specks, becoming yellow when fully ripe. Flesh white and melting, with a rich, sugary, high-flavoured juice.

Ripe the beginning and middle of October, and will keep till the end of November.

This succeeds on both the Pear and the Quince. It bears very well on a standard, but better as an espalier. The fruit is generally larger than the specimen figured in the Horticultural Transactions. It is a most excel. lent Pear, and well deserves cultivation.

47. CHARLES D'AUTRICHE. Hort. Trans. Vol. iii. p. 120. Ib. Vol. iv. p. 521.

Fruit large, very handsome, about three inches and a half long, and three inches broad, in colour something like a white Beurré, but in shape more convex and irregular. Eye in a confined hollow, not deeply sunk. Stalk an inch long. Skin greenish yellow, profusely sprinkled with brown specks, and partially russetted. Flesh white, melting, very juicy, with a rich high flavour, but with little perfume.

Ripe the beginning to the end of November.

A very fine and beautiful fruit, raised by Dr. Van Mons, and sent to the Horticultural Society, where it was exhibited in November 1816.

48. CRASANNE. Langley, t. 65. f.5. Miller, No. 46. Duhamel, No. 49. t. 22.

Beurré Plat. Knoop. Pom. p. 154.

Fruit above the middle size, of a roundish turbinate figure, about two inches and a half deep, and a little

more in diameter. Eye small, and placed in a deep narrow basin, something like the eye of an apple. Stalk one inch and a quarter long, crooked, slender, and inserted in an open shallow cavity. Skin greenish yellow, thinly covered with a reticulated grey russet.

Flesh extremely tender, buttery, and full of a rich saccharine juice.

Ripe the beginning of November, and will keep till Christmas.

The Crasanne ripened at Twickenham, in 1727, on September 20. O. S., or October 1. N. S. Langley.

This succeeds on both the Pear and the Quince; but it is much better grafted upon the Pear stock. • M. de la Quintinie says, the Crasanne takes its name from ecrasé (flattened or crushed), its form generally giving to the fruit the appearance of having been pressed down. It is a most excellent bearer upon an east or south-east wall, and one of the very best Pears of its

season.

Its time of keeping in perfection may be considerably lengthened, by gathering the crop at three different times ; the first, a fortnight or more before it is ripe ; the second, a week or ten days afterwards ; and the third, when fully ripe : this last gathering will be the first to be brought to table, the middle gathering the next, and the first will be the last in succession.

By this mode of proceeding, this, as well as all the Autumnal Pears, may be kept several weeks longer in perfection, especially after hot summers, than by the usual method of waiting till the crop is ripe, and then gathering the whole at once.

49. DOUBLE D'AUTOMNE. Hort. Soc. Cat. No.227.

Fruit middle-sized, in the form of a Bergamot, handsomely round, without angles, and tapering towards the stalk. Eye small, open,

short segments of the calyx, sunk in a handsome, round, shallow basin. Stalk three quarters of an inch long, inserted in a small

with very

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