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This most excellent Pear is also a newly raised Flemish variety, grown in the Horticultural Society's garden at Chiswick, on an open standard.

71. Brown BEURRÉ. Miller, No. 34. Pom. Mag. t. 114.

Beurré. Of Duhamel, 75. t. 38.
Beurré Gris. Knoop. Pom. p. 135.
Beurré Rouge. Ib.
Beurré Doré. 16.
Beurré d'Anjou. Ib.
Beurré d'Or. 16.
Beurré d'Ambleuse. 16.
Beurré d'Amboise. Ib.
Poire d'Amboise. Ib.
Isambert. Ib.
Red Beurré,

l Golden Beurré,

Of English Catalogues, accordBeurré du Roi,

ing to the Pom. Mag. Fruit large, of an oblong figure, about four inches long, and three inches in diameter, tapering to the stalk. Eye'small, with a converging calyx, placed in a shallow depression. Stalk three quarters of an inch long, rather stout, and thickening obliquely into the fruit. Skin greenish yellow, appearing through a covering of thin russet, coloured more or less with brown or red on the sunny side. Flesh white, with some greenish veins through it, melting, buttery, juicy, rich and excellent.

Ripe in October, and will keep good only a few weeks.

This succeeds equally well on the Pear and the Quince.

This highly esteemed and well known Pear has had many different names assigned to it, as will be seen by the synonyms above quoted, and it has probably many more. Those which relate to colour, such as Grey, Golden, and Red, have originated from trees on different stocks, on different soils, and in different situ.

ations, of climate and of aspect, which, the practical gardener is well aware, contribute materially, not only to the colour of the Pear, but of the Apple and the Peach. Other names, and of these not a few, arise from the locality of places where the fruit happens to be cultivated. The Beurré Pear in France, as well as in this country, is esteemed as the best of its season. It is, however, a very tender tree, and more frequently cankered than any other Pear cultivated in English gardens; on this account alone it is absolutely necessary to plant it against a wall, upon a sound dry soil, and against a south or south-east aspect. Without attending to these particulars in the Brown Beurré Pear, all attempts to obtain fine and perfect specimens of fruit will be attended with disappointment.

72. CALEBASSE. Hort. Soc. Cat. No. 164. . Calebasse Musquée. Knoop. Pom. p. 94. t. 3.

Fruit long, very irregular in figure, broadly angular, and knobby, about four inches long, and two inches and a half in diameter, compressed below the middle, and bent. Eye open, with a very short acute calyx. Stalk one inch and a half long, bent, obliquely inserted under one or two knobby lips. Skin greyish yellow, tinged with a deeper yellow on the sunny side, and partially covered with a thin orange-grey russet.

Flesh breaking a little gritty, with a very saccharine and plentiful juice.

Ripe the end of September, and will keep two or three weeks.

73. CAPIAUMONT. Hort. Trans. Vol. v. p. 406.
Capiaumont. Pom. Mag. t. 59.
Beurré de Capiaumont. Hort. Soc. Cat. No. 91.

Fruit middle-sized, turbinate, regularly tapering to the stalk, about three inches and a quarter long, and two inches and a half in diameter. Eye not at all sunk, but level with the extremity. Stalk scarcely half an inch

long, inserted without any cavity. Skin a fine clear cinnamon, fading into yellow in the shade, and acquiring a rich bright red in the sun. Flesh yellowish, melting, buttery, very rich, and highly flavoured.

Ripe the middle of October, and will keep for two or three weeks.

This succeeds equally well upon the Pear and the Quince.

It is one of the best of those varieties raised in Flanders during the period when so large an accession was made to the cultivated fruits of that country. It is recorded to have owed its origin to a M. Capiaumont, of Mons. The first specimens which were seen in this country came to the Horticultural Society in 1820, from M. Parmentier, of Enghien.

It bears well as a standard, but is best cultivated as an open dwarf, grafted upon a Quince stock.

74. Chat-BRÛLÉ. Duhamel, No. 116.

Fruit middle-sized, of a pyramidal turbinate figure, about two inches and three quarters long, and two inches in diameter. Eye small, placed in a shallow plaited hollow. Stalk an inch long, obliquely inserted. Skin smooth, shining, of a pale yellow, but of a dark brown on the sunny side. Flesh melting, but not very juicy, and if kept too long is apt to grow meally.

75. DARIMONT. Hort. Soc. Cat. No. 215.

Fruit middle-sized, oblong, in some specimens slightly pyramidal, tapering a little towards the stalk, about three inches long, and two inches and a quarter in diameter. Eye small, open, the segments of the calyx generally falling off before the fruit is fully grown, placed in a very narrow shallow depression, and surrounded by a few slightly radiated plaits. Stalk three quarters of an inch long, inserted in a small uneven cavity, sometimes obliquely inserted under a small elongated lip. Skin a complete yellowish grey russet,

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sprinkled with numerous scabrous specks. Flesh white, gritty, but melting, with a saccharine, slightly musky, and somewhat astringent juice.

Ripe the end of September and beginning of October.

This is another of the new Flemish Pears, grown in the Horticultural Garden at Chiswick, upon an open standard.

76. Délices D’ARDENPONT. Hort. Soc. Cat. No. 217.

Fruit above the middle size, oblong pyramidal, enlarged beyond the middle, and compressed towards the stalk, with an uneven and somewhat knobby surface, about three inches and a quarter long, and two inches and a half in diameter. Eye small, with a short converging calyx, in a narrow shallow depression, surrounded by a few slight obtusely knobby plaits. Stalk an inch long, rather thick, curved, inserted in a rather oblique narrow cavity. Skin pale yellow, full of small grey russetty dots, and partially covered with a thin cinnamon-coloured russet. Flesh yellowish white, rather gritty, but very mellow when matured, and full of a sugary, slightly astringent, pleasant, somewhat musky, perfumed juice.

Ripe the beginning and middle of October.

This is another of those very fine Pears lately introduced from Flanders, and grown in the Horticultural Society's garden at Chiswick, upon an open standard. It was raised by the late Counsellor Hardenpont, of Mons, by whom a number of other good Flemish Pears were obtained from seed some years ago. 77. DILLEN.

Hort. Trans. Vol. iii. p. 119. Gros Dillen. Hort. Soc. Cat. No. 223.

Fruit ovate, irregularly turbinate, about three inches and a half long, and nearly three inches in diameter. Eye flat. Stalk short and thick. Skin yellowish green,

slightly speckled with brown. Flesh white, with a slight musky flavour, and very little core.

Ripe early in October, and will keep a few weeks.
A fine buttery Pear of the first order, and very hand-

It was received by the Horticultural Society from Dr. Van Mons, of Brussels, in 1817. 78. DOYENNÉ Panaché. Hort.

Hort. Trans. Vol. vii.

some.

p. 177.

Fruit in form the same as the Grey Doyenné, but tapers a little more towards the stalk.

Skin a bright clear yellow, faintly striped with green and red, and sprinkled all over with small russetty brown dots. Flesh white, melting, sweet, and very agreeable ; but it is not so high-flavoured as the Grey Doyenné.

In eating from October till Christmas. 79. DOYENNÉ SANTELETE. Hort. Soc. Cat. No. 241.

Fruit above the middle size, pyramidally oblong, not much unlike a Chaumantelle in shape, but narrow at the crown, and more compressed towards the stalk, about three inches and a half long, and two inches and a half in diameter. Eye small, open, with a very shut strigose calyx, slightly sunk in a narrow obtusely angular hollow. Stalk an inch long or more, curved, very slightly inserted, sometimes a little obliquely, in a narrow base. Skin pale green, thinly covered with detached specks of grey russet, which are more numerous round the stalk. Flesh white, a little gritty, but tender. Juice saccharine, with a slight musky perfume.

Ripe the beginning of October, and will keep till the end.

This is a very fine handsome Pear from Flanders, grown in the Horticultural Society's garden at Chiswick, upon an open standard.

80. Duchess of ANGOULÊME. Pom. Mag. t. 76.

Duchesse d'Angoulême. Hort. Trans. Vol. vii. p. 176. t. 3.

Bon Jard. 1829, p. 328.

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