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gritty, but very soft and mellow, abounding with a saccharine and slightly musky juice.

Ripe the beginning of October, and good to the end.

This very fine and handsome Pear is one of those lately introduced from Flanders into the Horticultural Garden at Chiswick, where it is grown as an open standard.

99. Riche DEPOUILLE. Hort. Trans. Vol.v. p. 409. Riche d'Apoie. Ib.

Fruit somewhat resembling the Saint Germain in shape and size, and tapering considerably towards the stalk. Eye prominent. Stalk one inch and a half long, rather thick. Skin of a clear citron yellow, with a slight tinge of bright red on the sunny side, a little mottled with russet, and rough like the skin of an orange. Flesh white, melting, not perfumed, but sweet and very pleasant.

Ripe in the autumn and winter months.
This succeeds on both the Pear and the Quince.

Raised some years ago on the Continent, and was brought into this country under the name of Riche d'Apoie.

100. ROUSSELINE. Miller, No. 40. Duhamel, No. 37. t. 15.

Muscat à longue queue de la fin d'Automne. Ib.

Fruit small, of a somewhat oblong figure, swelled out in the middle, tapering to the crown, and compressed towards the stalk, about two inches and a quarter long, and one inch and a half in diameter. Eye very small, with a converging calyx, placed in a rather hollow, plaited basin. Stalk one inch and three quarters long, slender, inserted in a small cavity. Skin smooth, of a greenish yellow on the shaded side, but where fully exposed to the sun, of a lively deep red, sprinkled with numerous grey specks.

Flesh very tender and delicate, with a sweet and agreeably perfumed juice.

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Ripe the beginning of October, and will keep a month.

This succeeds on the Pear, but not at all on the Quince.

101. SECKLE. Hort. Trans. Vol. iii. p. 256. t. 9. Pom. Mag. t. 72.

New York Red Cheek. Hort. Soc. Cat. 432.
Sycle,

of some Collections, accordRed-cheeked Seckle, ing to the Pom. Mag.

Fruit rather small, somewhat turbinate, a little compressed towards the stalk, about two inches and three quarters long, and two inches and a quarter in diameter. Eye small, open, with a very short calyx, prominently placed on the convex apex.

Stalk half an inch long, obliquely inserted in a small cavity. Skin dull brown, or brownish green, with a very bright red cheek. Flesh tender, juicy, melting, peculiarly rich and high-flavoured, with a powerful but most agreeable aroma, totally different from that usually perceived in perfumed Pears.

Ripe the middle and end of October.

This beautiful and excellent little Pear ranks among the richest of the American varieties. An account of it was transmitted by Dr. Hosack, of New York, to the Horticultural Society in 1819, extracted from Coxe's work on American Fruit Trees, p. 189. It bears its fruit in clusters at the ends of the branches, is very hardy as an open standard, ripening its fruit with certainty; but they do not keep in perfection more than a few days,

102. Swan's Egg. Langley, t. 64. f. 4. English Gardens.

Fruit small, of an oval, turbinate figure, about two inches long, and one inch and three quarters in diameter. Eye small, with a very short calyx, prominently placed on the apex, surrounded by a few wrinkled plaits. Stalk three quarters of an inch long, slender, somewhat obliquely inserted, with but little cavity. Skin greenish yellow, covered on the sunny side with dull brown, inter

Of all

mixed with small russetty specks. Flesh soft and melting, with a very rich musky saccharine juice. .

Ripe the end of September and beginning of October, and will keep only a few weeks in perfection.

The Swan's Egg Pear is known to every gardener and dealer in fruit in every county in England; its great certainty in bearing, and the excellence of its fruit, render it an universal favourite. The tree is readily distinguished in the orchard from almost every sort, by its upright and spire-like growth.

103. URBANISTE. Hort. Trans. Vol. v. p. 411.

Fruit pyramidally ovate, very even in form, but compressed towards the stalk; about three inches and a half long, and two inches and three quarters in diameter. Eye a little sunk in a very narrow crown.

Stalk an inch long, obliquely inserted in a moderately deep cavity. Skin pale green, inclining to yellow, profusely sprinkled with greenish specks, with small patches of grey russet dispersed over its whole surface, but more particularly round the eye and the stalk.

and the stalk. Flesh white towards the outside, but deepens to a reddish yellow next the core, which is large, and possesses a small quantity of grit; it is, nevertheless, quite melting, juicy, and very sweet, with a little perfume.

Ripe the end of September and beginning of October.

Raised by the Count de Coloma, of Malines ; and specimens of the fruit were exhibited at the Horticultural Society from that gentleman in 1823.

104. VERTE LONGUE. Miller, No. 36. Duhamel, No. 73.

Mouille-bouche. Ib.
Muscat-fleuré. Bon Jard. 1827. p. 311.

Fruit pretty large, of a long pyramidal figure, about three inches and a half long, and two inches and a half in diameter. Eye small, with an open calyx, pro

minently seated on the convex summit. Stalk an inch long, straight, inserted without any cavity. Skin green, which continues till its maturity. Flesh white, melting, and very full of a saccharine, well-flavoured juice.

Ripe the middle of October, and will keep a few weeks only.

This succeeds on both the Pear and the Quince; but it is best on the Pear on dry, hot soils.

105. VERTE LONGUE PANACHÉE. Duhamel, 74. t. 37.

Verte longue Suisse. Ib.
Culotte de Suisse. Jard. Fruit. t. 38.

This in no way differs from the preceding one, except in being rather less, and in its striped fruit, which is beautifully coloured with green, yellow, and red.

It ripens also at the same time, and succeeds on both the Pear and the Quince ; but, like the former, it is best on the Pear for dry soils.

106. VIGNE. Miller, No. 39. Duhamel, No. 110. t. 58. f. 2.

Demoiselle. Ib.

Fruit small, of a turbinate figure, about one inch and three quarters long, and one inch and a half in diameter. Eye large and open. Stalk two inches long, slender, inserted in a small cavity. Skin rough, of a dull red colour, quite round, and full of grey specks. Flesh melting, and full of a pretty good juice.

Ripe the middle and end of October.
This succeeds on both the Pear and the Quince.
107. White DOYENNÉ. Pom. Mag. t. 60.
Doyenné Blanc. Hort. Soc. Cat. No. 233.
Doyenné. Duhamel, 81. t. 43.
Beurré Blanc. 16.
Bonne-ante. Ib.
Saint Michel Ib.

C C

Carlisle.

า Citron de Septembre. Kaiserbirne. Poire à courte queue. Poire de Limon. Of various Collections, acPoire de Neige. cording to the Pom. Mag. Poire de Seigneur. Poire Monsieur. Valencia. White Beurré.

Fruit pretty large, roundish oblong, narrowest at the stalk, about three inches and a half long, and two inches and three quarters in diameter. Eye very small, with small, acute, closed segments of the calyx, placed in a shallow depression. Stalk three quarters of an inch long, rather thick, inserted in a small cavity ; in some specimens it is diagonally inserted under a small elongated lip. Skin pale citron yellow, speckled throughout, more or less, with cinnamon russet, and tinged with orange brown on the sunny side. Flesh white, juicy, very buttery, and delicious.

Ripe the end of September, and good for three or four weeks.

This succeeds on both the Pear and the Quince.

An old and excellent Pear, bearing well in this country upon an open standard. It is one of the best to graft upon the Quince, and to cultivate en quenouille. It is best known in our gardens, and to English nurserymen, by the name of White Beurré.

Sect. V. - Winter Round-fruited. 108. AMBRETTE. Miller, No. 57. Duhamel, No.65. t. 31.

Ambre Gris. Knoop. Pom. p. 134.
Ambrette Grise. Ib.
Ambrette d'Hiver. Ib.

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