Page images
PDF
EPUB

124. COLMAR. Miller, No. 54. Duhamel, No. 94. t. 50.

Poire Manne. 16.
Bergamotte Tardive. Knoop. Pom. p. 134.
Incomparable. Ib.

Fruit pretty large, of a pyramidal turbinate figure ; about three inches and a quarter long, and two inches and three quarters in diameter, Eye large, and deeply hollowed. Stalk an inch long, rather thick, bent, inserted in a tolerably deep oblique cavity. Skin smooth, green, with a few yellowish grey specks; as it becomes mature, it turns more yellow, and has sometimes a little colour on the sunny side. Flesh greenish white, very tender, and full of a saccharine, rich, highly-flavoured juice.

In eating from November till January.
This succeeds on both the Pear and the Quince.
125. D’Auch. Forsyth, Ed. 7. No. 68.
Poire d’Auch. Of some Collections.

Fruit pretty large, of a pyramidal turbinate figure, greatly resembling the Colmar in almost every respect, except in being a little more full next the stalk, and in being, perhaps, a fortnight later in arriving at maturity; its flesh is, moreover, never yellow, and it has the advantage of a higher flavour.

A similarity of appearance has led some to suppose they were both the same. Experience, however, does not warrant this supposition ; for, in every situation where it has been tried, it has proved far more productive, and also a much hardier tree. It was introduced into this country before 1817, by the late Duke of Northumberland.

126. EASTER BEURRÉ. Pom. Mag. t. 78. Bergamotte de la Pentecôte. Nois. Manuel, Vol. ii.

p. 537.

Beurré d'Hiver de Bruxelles. Taschenbuch, p. 420.

Dayenné d'Hiver. Of some Collections, according to the Pom. Mag.

Fruit large, roundish oblong, broadest towards the eye, nearly four inches long, and three inches and a half in diameter. Eye small with a connivent calyx, sunk in a moderately deep depression. Stalk short, thick, sunk in a deep obtuse-angled cavity. Skin green, thickly mottled with small russetty dots ; when ripe becoming yellowish, and coloured with brown, somewhat streaky, on the sunny side. Flesh whitish, inclining to yellow, perfectly buttery and melting, and extremely highflavoured.

In eating from November till May.
This succeeds on both the Pear and the Quince.

Of all the very late keeping Pears this is decidedly the best. It has been recently introduced into this country from the Continent, but its origin there is not known. It is a most profuse bearer, grafted upon the Quince, and requires a south or south-east wall.

This must not be confounded with the Easter Bergamot, a good but inferior variety ; from which it is distinguishable, not only by its fruit, but also by its wood, which is reddish brown, not green, as that of the former sort.

The Easter Beurré bears well as an open standard in the Horticultural Garden at Chiswick. The specimens produced there in 1830, were very beautiful; three inches and a quarter long, and three inches in diameter.

127. FLEMISH BON-CHRÉTIEN. Bon-chrétien Nouvelle Espèce. Hort. Gard. Coll.

Fruit large, oblong, turbinate, tapering towards the stalk, where it is slightly compressed ; about four inches and a half long, and three inches and a half in diameter. Eye open, with a very short calyx, sunk in a rather shallow, round, even, depression. Stalk one inch and a half long, embossed next the fruit, a little curved,

and obliquely inserted under an elongated single or double lip; in some specimens which are more conical, the stalk is direct and straight, and not obliquely inserted. Skin green, becoming yellow, thickly sprinkled with

grey russetty specks, and which form a mottled russet on the sunny side. Flesh yellowish white, breaking, a little gritty, but becoming mellow when matured Juice saccharine, with a slight musky perfume.

In eating from the beginning of November till the middle or end of January.

It succeeds very well upon the Quince stock.
This

very fine Pear has been lately raised in Flanders, and sent to the Horticultural Society of London, in whose garden at Chiswick it (in 1830) produced some uncommonly fine fruit upon an open standard, from which this description was taken.

128. FORELLE. Hort. Trans. Vol. v. p. 408. t. 17. Pom. Mag. t. 112.

Forellen-birne. Diel, Pomol. Vol. v. p. 51.

Poire Truite. Of the French, according to the Pom. Mag.

Fruit rather below the middle size, not very constant in form, but generally obovate, and more or less elongated; about three inches long, and two inches and a half in diameter. Eye rather shallow. Stalk half an inch long or more, slender, straight, inserted in a rather shallow but oblique cavity. Skin, when fresh gathered, green on one side, and red on the other, changing to a deep rich sanguine, speckled with greyish, ocellate, broad spots next the sun, and a clear lemon on the other side. Flesh white, juicy, buttery, with a rich, aromatic, subacid, vinous flavour.

In eating from November till January.

It never shrivels, but remains quite melting to the last.

This is a very beautiful Pear, and bears well as a standard. It is called the Forelle, Truite, or Trout Pear, from a fancied resemblance between the spots and colour of its skin and those of the fish so called. Dr. Diel supposes it originated in Northern Saxony.

It was brought to this country a few years ago, and fruited by Mr. Knight of Downton Castle, who sent it for exhibition to the Horticultural Society about 1823.

129. GLOUT MORCEAU. Hort. Soc. Cat. No. 291. Gloux Morceaux.* Hort. Trans. Vol. vii. p. 179.

t. 4.

Fruit very like the Beurré d'Aremberg, but larger, more oval, not so turbinate in its shape, about four inches long, and three inches and a half in diameter. Eye small, deeply sunk, in an uneven oblique hollow. Stalk an inch long, rather deeply inserted in an oblique cavity. Skin pale dull olive green, a little inclining to yellow, and covered with numerous grey russetty specks, with russetty blotches round the stalk. Flesh whitish, firm, very juicy, but a little gritty at the core.

Ripe in November, and will keep till February or March.

This very beautiful and very fine variety was sent to the Horticultural Society by M. Parmentier of Enghien, along with the Beurré d'Aremberg, in November, 1820. It requires an east or south-east wall to grow it in perfection ; but very fine specimens were (in 1830) grown upon open standards in the Horticultural Garden at Chiswick, three inches and a half long, and three inches in diameter.

130. GRUMKOWER. Grumkower Winterbirne. Hort. Soc. Cat. No. 316. Fruit middle-sized, in shape somewhat like a Bon

* M. Dumortier Rutteau of Tournay, in a letter recently received from him, asserts that the proper orthography of this name is Glout Morceau.

[ocr errors]

chrétien, having a few obtuse angles or ribs extending from the middle of the fruit to the crown, and narrowed towards the stalk; usually about three inches long, and two inches and a quarter in diameter. Eye narrow. Stalk half an inch long, inserted without any cavity. Skin smooth, pale green, sprinkled with a few grey specks. Flesh melting. Juice plentiful, saccharine, with a good deal of musky flavour.

Ripe in November, and will keep till Christmas.

131. LENT SAINT GERMAIN. Hort. Soc. Cat. No. 514.

Easter Saint Germain. Of some Gardens.

Fruit pretty large, of an oblong figure, broadest in the middle, and tapering to each extremity. Eye small and prominently seated. Stalk an inch long, slender, obliquely inserted under an elongated lip. Skin pale green, full of small white specks. Flesh firm and breaking, with a very good flavoured juice.

In eating in March and April.

This, although not a high-flavoured Pear, deserves cultivation, as it comes into eating when most Winter Pears are gone.

132. Martin SEC. Miller, No. 48. Duhamel, No. 36. t. 14.

Ronville. 16.

Fruit middle-sized, of a pyramidal figure, somewhat turbinate, about three inches long, and two inches and a quarter in diameter. Eye small, open, seated in a somewhat deep obtuse-angled basin. Stalk one inch and a half long, inserted in a small angular cavity. Skin of a deep russet colour on the shaded side, but where exposed to the sun, of a lively red, covered with numerous grey specks. Flesh crisp. Juice sugary, with an agreeable perfume.

In eating from November till January.

D D

« PreviousContinue »