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HOMILETIC REVIEW

VOL. XXXIV.
FROM JULY TO DECEMBER

1897

EDITORS:

I. K. FUNK, D.D., LL.D., AND D. S. GREGORY, D.D., LL.D..

PUBLISHERS:
FUNK AND WAGNALLS COMPANY

NEW YORK AND LONDON

1897

COPYRIGHT, 1897, BY
FUNK & WAGNALLS COMPANY.

THE HOMILETIC REVIEW.

Vol. XXXIV.—JULY, 1897.—No. I.

REVIEW SECTION.
1.—THE TRAINING OF TRUE PREACHERS.

BY JOSEPH PARKER, D.D., CITY TEMPLE, LONDON. ROBERTSON, of Brighton, has said that it would be a mistake to suppose that the merchants of the world are uneducated. He is careful to state that he does not limit education to merely scholastic or technical learning, for in that case comparatively few men of business could lay claim to any adequate education. The meaning is that there is now so much intellectual friction occasioned by the ever-enlarging transactions of business that the minds of merchants are quickened and edged by many agencies that are not in any sense academical or official. The man of business has to be quite on the alert to-day or he will inevitably go to the bankruptcy court. It is not enough to have an abundance of mere money. My contention has always been that money does not cover the whole definition of the word “capital.” This is a most important distinction, the losing sight of which may embarrass a whole line of thought on questions connected with capital and labor. If money is considered the kernel of capital, we must not forget the place of genius, foresight, experience, and that keen appreciation of events which is generally designated a correct knowledge of the signs of the times. Money without ability is not capital. Genius can do more without money than money can do without genius. It may be said, therefore, in the sense intended by Mr. Robertson, that men have their wits sharpened and vitalized by all the agencies of modern civilization, whether they have been to school, or have only been in the larger university of the market-place. Modern civilization has no place for dullards.

Under this definition I have no hesitation in saying that all true preachers have undergone, and are undergoing, special training for their work. In a sense they can not escape the effect and influence of this training because of the very atmosphere in which their daily life

NOTE.—This periodical adopts the Orthography of the following Rule, recommended by the joint action of the American Philological Association and the Philological Society of England:-Change d or od final to t when so pronounced, except when the e affects a preceding sound. PUBLISHERS.

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