Law, the State, and the International Community

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The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd., 2002 - Law - 1052 pages
Scott, James Brown. Law, The State, and the International Community. New York: Columbia University Press, 1939. Two volumes. Reprinted 2002 by The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd. LCCN 2001018648. ISBN 1-58477-178-X. Cloth. $175. * Volume One: A Commentary on the Development of Legal, Political and International Ideals. Volume Two: Extracts Illustrating the Growth of Theories, and Principles of Jurisprudence, Government, and The Law of Nations. "This is a work of ambitious scope and conspicuous industry. It attempts a survey of the chief currents of political and juridical speculation from classical times to the end of the 16th century. The author divides his subject into six main periods: The Greek Background, The Roman Heritage, The Christian Heritage (Ancient and Medieval), The Transition from Medieval to Modern Thought, The Era of Reform, The Beginning of the Modern Age. The terminus is Richard Hooker on the brink of the 17th century. From the Dark Ages onwards, the teachings of twenty celebrated theological, political, and international savants are analyzed and presented in concentrated form. (...) One of Professor Scott's best chapters is on Francisco de Vittoria (c. 1483-1546), who is of particular interest for his influence on Grotius, and to whose remarkable Relectio de Indis Professor Scott has devoted special research." Marke, A Catalogue of the Law Collection at New York University (1953) 926.

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Contents

I
3
II
43
III
61
IV
68
V
85
VI
92
VII
107
VIII
133
XX
271
XXI
278
XXII
295
XXIII
310
XXIV
324
XXV
353
XXVI
363
XXVII
393

IX
137
X
143
XI
158
XII
165
XIII
184
XIV
196
XV
206
XVI
213
XVII
223
XVIII
228
XIX
241
XXVIII
425
XXIX
452
XXX
468
XXXI
484
XXXII
521
XXXIII
546
XXXIV
558
XXXV
570
XXXVI
593
XXXVII
615
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Page 179 - Wilt thou then not be afraid of the power ? do that which is good, and thou shalt have praise of the same : for he is the minister of God to thee for good. But if thou do that which is evil, be afraid ; for he beareth not the sword in vain : for he is the minister of God, a revenger to execute wrath upon him that doeth evil.
Page 176 - And he said, Woe unto you also, ye lawyers ! for ye lade men with burdens, grievous to be borne, and ye yourselves touch not the burdens with one of your fingers.
Page 178 - Again, the devil taketh him up into an exceeding high mountain, and sheweth him all the kingdoms of the world, and the glory of them; and saith unto him, All these things will I give thee, if thou wilt fall down and worship me.
Page 180 - For when the Gentiles, which have not the law, do by nature the things contained in the law, these having not the law, are a law unto themselves ; which shew the work of the law written in their hearts, their conscience also bearing witness, and their thoughts the meanwhile accusing or else excusing one another,) in the day when God shall judge the secrets of men by Jesus Christ, according to.
Page 177 - Ye have heard that it hath been said, An eye for an eye, and a tooth for a tooth: but I say unto you, That ye resist not evil: but whosoever shall smite thee on thy right cheek, turn to him the other also. And if any man will sue thee at the law. and take away thy coat, let him have thy cloke also. And whosoever shall compel thee to go a mile, go with him twain. Give to him that asketh thee, and from him that would borrow of thee turn not thou away.
Page 613 - Guid faith he mauna fa' that! For a' that, and a' that, Their dignities, and a' that, The pith o' sense, and pride o' worth, Are higher rank than a" that. Then let us pray that come it may, As come it will for a' that; That sense and worth, o'er a' the earth, May bear the gree, and a' that. For a
Page 599 - ... there can be but one supreme power, which is the legislative, to which all the rest are and must be subordinate, yet the legislative being only a fiduciary power to act for certain ends, •'' there remains still in the people a supreme power to remove or alter the legislative, when they find the legislative act_ contrary to the trust reposed in them.
Page 129 - The vain titles of the victories of Justinian are crumbled into dust: but the name of the legislator is inscribed on a fair and everlasting monument. Under his reign, and by his care, the civil jurisprudence was digested in the immortal works of the CODE, the PANDECTS, and the...
Page 608 - There is no wealth but life — -life, including all its powers of love, of joy, and of admiration. That country is the richest which nourishes the greatest number of noble and happy human beings...
Page 37 - That which doth assign unto each thing the kind, that which doth moderate the force and power, that which doth appoint the form and measure, of working, the same we term a law.

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