The Day the Dancers Stayed: Performing in the Filipino/American Diaspora

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Temple University Press, Sep 25, 2009 - Music - 228 pages
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Pilipino Cultural Nights at American campuses have been a rite of passage for youth culture and a source of local community pride since the 1980s. Through performances—and parodies of them—these celebrations of national identity through music, dance, and theatrical narratives reemphasize what it means to be Filipino American. In The Day the Dancers Stayed, scholar and performer Theodore Gonzalves uses interviews and participant observer techniques to consider the relationship between the invention of performance repertoire and the development of diasporic identification.

Gonzalves traces a genealogy of performance repertoire from the 1930s to the present. Culture nights serve several functions: as exercises in nostalgia, celebrations of rigid community entertainment, and occasionally forums for political intervention. Taking up more recent parodies of Pilipino Cultural Nights, Gonzalves discusses how the rebellious spirit that enlivened the original seditious performances has been stifled.

 

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Contents

Prologue
1
Introduction
9
Inventing Philippine Folkloric Forms Manila 1934
29
Dancing Diplomats and Cultural Authenticity Brussels 1958
62
The Filipino Cultural Night Los Angeles 1983
89
The Mechanics of Reverse Exile San Francisco 1993
112
Exploring Parody with Tongue in a Moods PCN Salute San Francisco 1997
127
Conclusion
141
Memoria
148
Notes
151
Bibliography
185
Index
211
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Theodore S. Gonzalves is Associate Professor of American Studies at the University of Hawai`i at Manoa.

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