The Elements of Moral Science

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Cooke and Company, 1835 - Christian ethics - 448 pages
"This book presents to the public a new treatise upon moral science and moral philosophy. Being designed for the purposes of instruction, its aim is, to be simple, clear, and purely didactic. I have rarely gone into extended discussion, but have contented myself with the attempt to state the moral law, and the reason of it, in as few and as comprehensive terms as possible"--Preface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved)
 

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Page 10 - Because that which may be known of God is manifest in them, for God hath showed it unto them. For the invisible things of him, from the creation of the world are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made, even his Eternal Power and God-head, so that they are without excuse...
Page 331 - Likewise, ye wives, be in subjection to your own husbands, that, if any obey not the word, they also may without the word be won by the conversation of the wives, while they behold your chaste conversation coupled with fear.
Page 179 - Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord thy God in vain: for the Lord will not hold him guiltless that taketh his name 'in vain. Remember the Sabbath day, to keep it holy. Six days shalt thou labor, and do all thy work: but the seventh day is the Sabbath of the Lord thy God: in it thou shalt not do any work, thou, nor thy son, nor thy daughter, thy manservant, nor thy maidservant, nor thy cattle, nor thy stranger that is within thy gates...
Page 269 - Whosoever therefore shall break one of these least commandments, and shall teach men so, shall be called least in the kingdom of heaven: but whosoever shall do and teach them, he shall be called great in the kingdom of heaven.
Page 406 - It blesseth him that gives, and him that takes ; 'Tis mightiest in the mightiest: it becomes The throned monarch better than his crown; His sceptre shows the force of temporal power, The attribute to awe and majesty, Wherein doth sit the dread and fear of kings; But mercy is above this sceptred sway, It is enthroned in the hearts of kings, It is an attribute to God himself; And earthly power doth then show likest God's When mercy seasons justice.
Page 139 - He that saith, I know him, and keepeth not his commandments, is a liar, and the truth is not in him.
Page 320 - Again, ye have heard that it hath been said by them of old time, Thou shalt not forswear thyself, but shalt perform unto the Lord thine oaths: But I say unto you, Swear not at all...
Page 30 - tis done, then 'twere well It were done quickly. If the assassination Could trammel up the consequence, and catch, With his surcease, success ; that but this blow Might be the be-all and the end-all here, But here, upon this bank and shoal of time, — We'd jump the life to come.
Page 31 - To plague the inventor: this even-handed justice Commends the ingredients of our poison'd chalice To our own lips. He's here in double trust: First, as I am his kinsman and his subject, Strong both against the deed; then, as his host. Who should against his murderer shut the door, Not bear the knife myself.
Page 91 - I have of late— but wherefore I know not— lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercises; and indeed it goes so heavily with my disposition that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory...

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