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LORD BISHOP OF ST. DAVID'S ;
WITH THE
HISTORY OF THOSE CONTROVERSIES

IN WHICH HE WAS ENGAGED :

and an
ABSTRACT OF THOSE FUNDAMENTAL DOCTRINES

Which he maintained and defended in the Latin tongue.

BY

ROBERT NELsoN, Esq.

-

A NEW EDITION.

OXFORD,
PRINTED BY W. BAXTER ;

For J. PARKER : AND LAW AND WHITTAKER ; AND OGLEs,
DUNCAN, AND Co CHRAN, LONDON.

BX 5199

N43 1816. C O N T E NTs.

INTRODUCTION.

THE occasion of writing the Life, p. 1.
An apology for attempting it, ibid.
His own reputation secured by his works, 2.
Why it may be acceptable to learned and good men, 3.
Reasons for the length of it, 4.

I. When and where Mr. Bull was born, 5. His family and parentage, ibid. Early dedicated to the service of the church, 6. o II. Educated at Tiverton school in Devonshire, 7. An account and character of his master, 8. His great and early progress in classic learning, ibid. III. Removed to Exeter college in Oxford, 9. Taken notice of by two great men, 10. Acquainted with Mr. Clifford, afterwards Lord High Treasurer, 11. IV. He retires from Oxford, upon refusing the Engagement, 12. He goes with his tutor, Mr. Ackland, to NorthCadbury, 13. Influenced to great seriousness by a sister, 14. W. He puts himself under the conduct of an eminent divine, 15. The advantage of seminaries for the candidates of holy Orders, ibid. The fruit to be reaped from them, 16. He is put under the direction of Mr. Thomas, 17. He contracts a friendship with Mr. Thomas's son, which was very advantageous to him, 18. VI. He enters into holy Orders, 20. He was but one and twenty when ordained Priest, 21. His forwardness in

such times an argument of his zeal, 22.

VII. He settles at St. George's near Bristol, 23. A little
accident which contributed to his reputation, 24. Dis-
turbed in his Sermon by a Quaker, 25,
VIII. The method he took in governing his parish, 27. The
parish infested with Antinomian books, 29. The excel-
lency of Mr. Bull's method, 30.
IX. The prayers he used in public, 31. An instance of the
Common-Prayer being admired by the dissenters when
used by Mr. Bull, ibid. An eminent danger he was pre-
served from, 32. He goes to Oxford once a year for
the use of libraries, 33.
X. Mr. Bull marries Mrs. Bridget Gregory, 35. Her cha-
racter, 36.
XI. He was presented to Suddington St. Mary's, 38. He
was made privy to the design of a general insurrection in
fifty-nine, 39. His preaching at Cirencester, and the
occasion of it, 40.
XII. He was presented to the vicarage of Suddington St.
Peter, 41. He marries a couple publicly by the form of
Common-Prayer, 43. Reading the prayers devoutly no
mean attainment, and of great advantage to the people,
44.
XIII. His manner of preaching, and the frequency of it,
45. He only writ the scheme of his sermons, 47. His
care in catechising the youth, 48. Baptism and the
Eucharist how administered by him, 49. His observation
of the holy-days of the Church, 50.
XIV. The religious government of his family, 52. His
private devotions, 55. The pious frame and temper of
his mind, 56. His singing of Psalms in his private de-
votions, 57. The singing of Psalms of the old version
defended by Bishop Beveridge, 58. The character of
his sermons, 59.
XV. Mr. Bull's manner of governing this parish, 61. He
confirms two ladies that were wavering in their religion,
63. A ridiculous story of a Quaker's challenge, 64. His
charity to the poor and indigent, ibid. His sentiments
upon charity, 65.
XVI. His only diversion agreeable conversation, 67. He

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