The Light Across the River

Front Cover
Kregel Publications - Juvenile Fiction - 210 pages

In this powerful sequel to "Across the Wide River," the Rankin home is still a beacon of freedom on the Underground Railroad. Johnny, the seventh of thirteen children in the Rankin family, is growing up quickly and in 1837 is eager to take on the same responsibilities as the rest of his family. But Johnny's father and his brother Lowry think Johnny is too young and too hotheaded to help with something as important and secretive as the Underground Railroad. Johnny understands the need for secrecy, but sometimes the secret is just too good to keep to himself! This engaging novel for young adults offers a further glimpse into a dark period of America's past, and profiles the courageous and godly people who helped bring about its end.

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Two thumbs, way, way up!

User Review  - Samantha - Christianbook.com

I must say that this is one of the best books I have ever read, and I am quite the avid reader. From warm, family moments to nail-biting suspense, I enjoyed this from page one all the way to the very ... Read full review

User Review  - Home School Book Review - Christianbook.com

The family of John Rankin, an abolitionist minister, lived in Ripley, OH. Author Stephanie Reed chronicled the coming of age of the oldest Rankin son, Lowry, in Across the Wide River. In this sequel ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

II
11
III
19
IV
30
V
41
VI
54
VII
63
VIII
74
IX
88
XI
105
XII
116
XIII
131
XIV
149
XV
163
XVI
175
XVII
186
XVIII
207

X
93

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Popular passages

Page 171 - THE LORD THAT DELIVERED ME OUT OF THE PAW OF THE LION, AND OUT OF THE PA\V OF THE BEAR, HE WILL DELIVER ME OUT OF THE HAND OF THIS PHILISTINE.
Page 61 - Thou shalt not deliver unto his master the servant which is escaped from his master unto thee : he shall dwell with thee, even among you, in that place which he shall choose in one of thy gates, where it liketh him best: thou shalt not oppress him.
Page 103 - Wait here," he too joined the surgeon. Rory sat with her elbows on her knees, her face buried in her hands. She hadn't slept in almost twenty-four hours, yet she wasn't tired. She hadn't eaten since lunch the day before, yet she wasn't hungry. She was numb, dazed, in a state of bewilderment. And the waiting continued. She passed through some periods when she felt better, some when she started to tremble...
Page 62 - He knew it was the wrong thing to say the minute the words left his mouth.
Page 129 - We can do the dead no good, so our next duty is to preserve the living.
Page 97 - Say the word, Lowry, and I will break every bone in his slavehunting body in less than a minute!

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