High Output Management

Front Cover
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, Nov 18, 2015 - Business & Economics - 272 pages
In this legendary business book and Silicon Valley staple, the former chairman and CEO (and employee number three) of Intel shares his perspective on how to build and run a company.

The essential skill of creating and maintaining new businesses—the art of the entrepreneur—can be summed up in a single word: managing. Born of Grove’s experiences at one of America’s leading technology companies, High Output Management is equally appropriate for sales managers, accountants, consultants, and teachers, as well as CEOs and startup founders. Grove covers techniques for creating highly productive teams, demonstrating methods of motivation that lead to peak performance—throughout, High Output Management is a practical handbook for navigating real-life business scenarios and a powerful management manifesto with the ability to revolutionize the way we work.
 

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great book, Andrew is truly a rock star in mgmt !!!! a lot you can take from his lesson

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User Review  - Nicholas Moryl - Goodreads

Good book on technology company management. Read full review

Contents

Delivering
3
Managing the Breakfast Factory
15
Managerial Leverage
39
MeetingsThe Medium of Managerial Work
71
Decisions Decisions
88
Todays Actions for Tomorrows
102
lo Modes of Control
144
The Sports Analogy
157
TaskRelevant Maturity
172
Manager as Judge
181
Two Difficult Tasks
203
Compensation as TaskRelevant Feedback
213
Why Training Is the Bosss Job
221
One More Thing
229
Index
237
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About the author (2015)

Andrew S. Grove emigrated to the United States from Hungary in 1956. He participated in the founding of Intel, and became its president in 1979 and chief executive officer in 1987. He was chosen as Time magazine’s Man of the Year in 1997. In 1998, he stepped down as CEO of Intel, and retired as chairman of the board in 2004. Grove taught at the Stanford University Graduate School of Business for twenty-four years. He died in 2016.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

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