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Von OEFELE, F., Die Angaben der Berliner Planatentafel, p. 8279.

Berlin, 1903 Votaw, C. _W., Sermon on the Mount (Dictionary of the Bible,

Extra Volume, 1 ff.).

WEBER, Jüdische Theologie. Leipzig, 1897.
WELLHAUSEN, J., Das Evangelium Marci, 1903.

Das Evangelium Matthæi, 1904.
Das Evangelium Lucæ, 1904.
Einleitung in Die Drei Ersten Evangelien, 1905. Berlin:

G. Reimer, 1905.

Skizzen und Vorarbeiten. Berlin, 1899. WESTCOTT and Hort, The New Testament in the Original Greek.

Introduction. London, 1896. WINER, G. B., Grammatik des Neutestamentlichen Sprachidioms.

Bearbeitet von P. W. Schmiedel, 1 Theil, 1894; 2 Theil,

i. 1897, ii. 1898. Göttingen. WINER-SCHMIEDEL, Grammatik des Neutestamentlichen Sprach

idioms. Göttingen, 1894. WRIGHT, A., Synopsis of the Gospels in Greek. London, 1903. Zahn, T., Forschungen für Geschichte des Neutestamentlichen

Kanons. Erlangen, 1881-1903.
Geschichte des Neutestamentlichen Kanons. Erlangen, 1888–

1890.
Einleitung in das Neue Testament. Leipzig, 1897–1899.
Das Evangelium des Matthäus. Leipzig, 1903.

ABBREVIATIONS.

(See also p. lxxxviii.)

.

Æsch.
Am. Pap.
Anth. P..
Aph.
Apoll. R.
Aą.
Arist.
Aristoph.
Asc. Is.
Ass. Mos.
B. .
Bab.
BU

Æschylus.
Amherst Papyri.
Anthologia Palatina,
Aphraates.
Apollonius Rhodius.
Aquila.
Aristotle.
Aristophanes.
Ascension of Isaiah.
Assumption of Moses.
Babylonian Talmud.

.

.

.

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Burk.
Class. Rev.
Clem. Alex.
Dalm.
DB.
DCG.
Deissm..
Demosth.
Diat.
Diod.
Dion. H.
Ditt. Syll.
Encycl. Bib.
Eph.
Epict.
Eus.
Ev. Pet.
Exp. Times
Hdt.

Aegyptische Urkunden aus den Koenig.

lichen Museum zu Berlin, 1892 ff.
Burkitt.
Classical Review.
Clement of Alexandria.
Dalman.
Dictionary of the Bible (Hastings).
Dictionary of Christ and the Gospels.
Deissmann.
Demosthenes.
Diatessaron of Tatian.
Diodorus.
Dionysius Halicarnassus.
Dittenberger Sylloge.
Encyclopædia Biblica.
Ephrem Syrus.
Epictetus.
Eusebius.
Evangelium Petri.
Expository Times.
Herodotus.

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Hor. Heb.
Hor. Syn.
Iren.
Jer.
Jos.
ThS.
Jub.
Just. Mart.
latt.
LXX
Luc.
Ong.
Or. Sib.
Ox. Pap.
Plut.
Polyb.
Ps.-Sol.
Sib. Or.
Sym.
Targ.
Tat.
Teb. Pap.
Tert.
Th.
Wellh.
WH.
Win.-Schm.
Xen.

Horæ Hebraicæ (Lightfoot).
Hora Synoptica (Hawkins).
Irenæus.
Jerusalem Talmud.
Josephus.
Journal of Theological Studies.
Jubilees.
Justin Martyr.
Manuscripts of the Old Latin Version.
The Septuagint Version.
Lucian.
The Targum of Onkelos.
Sibylline Oracles.
Oxyrhynchus Papyri.
Plutarch.
Polybius.
The Psalms of Solomon.
Sibylline Oracles.
Symmachus.
Targum.
Tatian.
Tebtunis Papyri.
Tertullian.
Theodotion.
Wellhausen.
Westcott and Hort.
Winer-Schmiedel.
Xenophon.

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The letters in the margin of the Commentary denote the sources from which the words are drawn: E

editorial passages. L the Matthæan Logia. M the Second Gospel. 0 quotations from the Old Testament borrowed from a

collection of Messianic prophecies. See pp. lxi f. P Palestinian traditions. X passages in which Mt. and Lk. agree closely,

borrowed from an unknown source or sources.

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THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO

S. MATTHEW.

A.-I. IL. BIRTH AND INFANCY OF THE MESSIAH.

I. 1-17. His Genealogy.

I. 1. Book of the generation of Jesus Christ, Son of David, Son E of Abraham.] Biblos yevérews is clearly borrowed from Gn 2** LXX. So far as the Hebrew of that passage is concerned, “These are the generations," etc., would seem to close the preceding section. But it is probable that the LXX translator connected it rather with 346-428. This section contains J's narratives of the creation of man, of the garden, of the Fall, of the birth of Cain and Abel, and of the descendants of Cain down to Lamech; ending with the births of Seth and of his son. yéveris here, therefore, covers the genealogy of mankind from Adam to Seth, and includes a good deal of narrative-matter relating to this period. In Gn 51 Biblos yevéoews occurs again, and here covers the genealogy of Adam as far as Japheth (582), with an appended history containing an account of the wickedness of men in the days of Noah (61-8). In 6 occurs the shorter superscription aurai Sè ai yevegels Nwe, introducing the account of the Flood, 69–92. Ιη το αύται δε αι γενέσεις των υιών Νώε introduces a list of the descendants of Noah, with an appended narrative of the tower of Babel (111-). In 1110 aütal ai yeréses nu introduces a list of the descendants of that patriarch to Terah; and in 1127 a similar formula ushers in the descendants of Terah. It is therefore clear that to a Jewish Christian writer acquainted with the LXX, ή βίβλος γενέσεως, or αύται αι γενέσεις, was a biblical phrase which might be used to describe a narrative containing, as in the case of Noah, a list of descendants, and some account of the life of the person named. In strict analogy we should expect Biblos yevérews

a

'ABpaáp. But, since for the editor the main interest centred in the person of Christ rather than of Abraham, it was not unnatural for him to depart from literary usage in this respect. It seems probable that the title should be taken as covering not the whole Gospel, but only that portion of it which gives Christ's ancestry and the circumstances of His birth and childhood.

Ιησού Χριστού.] This collocation is rare in the Synoptic Gospels. It occurs here, 118 ? 1621' Mk 11 only. Also in Jn 117 173 Xplotos has become a proper name, and lost its adjectival force. For the history of Xplotos as a Messianic title, see Dalm. Words, 289 ff.—vioù Aaveid) For “Son of David” as a title of the Messiah, see Dalm. Words, 319 ff.-viou 'Aßpadu] Cf. He 216 σπέρματος 'Αβραάμ επιλαμβάνεται. Τhe descent of the Messiah from Abraham is emphasised in Test. Levi 8. Cf. Volz Jiid. Eschat. 216.

The genealogy which follows was probably compiled by the editor for the purpose of his Gospel. (a) In accordance with this purpose he carries back the genealogy to Abraham, the first founder of the Jewish race. (6) He inserts details which are out of place in a strict genealogy, but which are in harmony with the theme of his Gospel, c.g. έκ της Θάμαρ, v.3 ; έκ της Ραχάβ, v.4 ; εκ της Ρούθ, v.5; έκ της του Ουρίου, v.4. These names are probably introduced as those of women, in whose case circunstances were overruled by the divine providence which, as it might have seemed, should have excluded them from a place in the ancestral line of the Messiah. They were in a sense forerunners of the Virgin Mary. (c) The division into three groups of fourteen names also has its purpose.

In David the family rose to royal power (Aaveid tör Basilea, v.). At the Captivity it lost it again. In the Christ it regained it.

For the names in the genealogy the compiler naturally had recourse to the Old Testament so far as that availed him. He appears to have used the LXX text.

V.2 comes from 1 Ch 134 21, v.3 from 1 Ch 24. 6. 9, vv.4-6a from 1 Ch 210-13, vv.6b-11 from 1 Ch 35. 10-15, vv.12, 18 to ZopoBased from 1 Ch 317-19. The names in come from an unknown source, probably from information received from Christ's

relations. E 2. Abraham begat Isaac; and Isaac begat Jacob; and Jacob

begat Judah and his brethren.] 'Aßpadu éyévvnde tòv 'Ioaák, from 1 Ch 134 και εγέννησεν Αβραάμ τον Ισαάκ. In the next clause lakóß comes from 1 Ch 134, where the Heb. has “ Israel.” This is at the outset a hint that the compiler is using the LXX rather than the Hebrew.-Ιούδαν και τους αδελφούς αυτού] The compiler borrows 'lovdá from 1 Ch 21, and then summarises the brethren whose names are there given as τους αδελφούς αυτού. The fact

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