Terror Truncated: The Decline of the Abu Sayyaf Group from the Crucial Year 2002

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Cambridge Scholars Publishing, Sep 1, 2014 - Political Science - 120 pages
The task of researching the material for this book proved more arduous than originally anticipated. The Abu Sayyaf Group was generally misunderstood in their formation, goals, ideology – if any – and structure. Consequently, it became necessary to chronologically trace all the crimes attributed to the group as well as research the lives and deeds of the leaders and majordomos in the group. This at times became a task of trying to distinguish what was fact from what was myth.

The main source of primary evidence for this book came from newspaper reports and official Philippine Government media releases – including Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP) releases. The newspaper reports, and AFP releases, were, in the main, carefully choreographed to reflect the domestic security policies of the Philippine Administration of the time. Individual reports, including those from the Bangkok-based Focus on the Global South, gave a more balanced account of the Abu Sayyaf activities and their leaders.

After careful consideration of all data and evidence available, it became obvious the Abu Sayyaf had been in decline since its heyday of 2002. This was even more so since the death of Khadaffy Janjalani in the middle part of the first decade of the 21st century. The conclusion reached was that the Abu Sayyaf in 2012 existed in name only – or fragmented cells – more so than any organised terrorist entity.

 

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“In the current international environment when so many aid workers, journalists, business people and travellers risk capture, Bob East’s empathetic and detailed account of Warren Rodwell’s hostage survival is a very timely publication that will attract a wide readership. Those who have read the account of Australian Nigel Brennan’s experience of 15 months in captivity in Somalia will find the story of Rodwell’s ordeal similarly instructive – and inspiring.”
—Richard Gehrmann, Senior Lecturer, School of Arts and Communication, University of Southern Queensland, Australia
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“Bob East’s 472 Days Captive of the Abu Sayyaf: The Survival of Australian Warren Rodwell is a well-researched and well-documented—but easy to read—account of this protracted kidnap-for-ransom in the southern Philippines. It is based on East’s exclusive access to Rodwell. I recommend it as an important addition to any strategic analyst’s library.”
—Clive Williams MG, Adjunct Professor, Centre for Policing, Intelligence and Counter Terrorism, Macquarie University
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“On 5 December 2011, Warren Rodwell was kidnapped from his adopted home in Ipil, Zamboanga province in the southern Philippines by the notorious Abu Sayyaf Group. Rodwell survived 15 months as a captive – a rare feat given the organisation’s reputation for beheading captives whose ransom is not quickly paid. This is the story of Rodwell’s ordeal, and how he survived against the odds.”
—Dr Damien Kingsbury, Professor of Asian Political and Security Studies, Deakin University, Australia
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“Warren Rodwell's story is one of modern day survival. Kidnapped by Islamic extremists while living in the Philippines, Warren survived for 15 months in captivity being moved from location to location. How he maintained his sanity let alone his life is an incredible feat of courage, guts and determination. Warren’s story proves that where there is life there is definitely hope. A true inspiration”
—David Richardson, Senior Journalist, 7 News Investigations and Features, Australia
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Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
CHAPTER ONE THE ABU SAYYAF 19902002
7
CHAPTER TWO 2002
23
CHAPTER THREE 2003
35
CHAPTER FOUR 2004
43
CHAPTER FIVE 20052006
51
CHAPTER SIX 2007
63
CHAPTER SEVEN 20082009
75
CHAPTER EIGHT 2010
83
CHAPTER NINE 20112012
91
CONCLUSION
97
BIBLIOGRAPHY
99
INDEX
105
Copyright

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About the author (2014)

Bob East is an independent Australian researcher who holds a PhD in International Peace and Conflict Studies. He has written extensively about insurgency in the southern Philippines – a region he has travelled to on a number of occasions. Bob lives on a rural property in the south-east of Queensland, Australia. He is widowed and has three adult children.

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