The Protestant vindicator; or, A refutation of the calumnies ... in [W.] Cobbett's History of the Reformation

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1826 - 80 pages

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Page 47 - O thou that, with surpassing glory crowned, Look'st from thy sole dominion like the god Of this new World — at whose sight all the stars Hide their diminished heads — to thee I call, But with no friendly voice, and add thy name, 0 Sun, to tell thee how I hate thy beams...
Page 109 - Alfred the Great complained, that from the Humber to the Thames there was not a priest who understood the liturgy in his mother-tongue, or who could translate the easiest piece of Latin ; and that from the Thames to the sea, the ecclesiastics were still more ignorant.
Page 26 - If so, to have limited themselves to any thing less, would have been disobedience to the express command they had received from their Master, to go into all nations, and to preach the Gospel to every creature. If, in the latter part of the lives of any of them, they were, through age and infirmities, confined to one place, that place would naturally fall under the immediate inspection of such. And this, if even so much as this, is all that has given rise to the tradition, (for there is nothing like...
Page 109 - One of the questions appointed by the canons to be put to persons who were candidates for orders was this, " Whether they could read the gospels and epistles, and explain the sense of them, at least literally?
Page 125 - The goodliest lordships, manors, lands, and territories are theirs. Besides this they have the tenth part of all the corn, meadow, pasture, grass, wool, colts, calves, lambs, pigs, geese, and chickens.
Page 141 - This grievance was now of an old date; and sir Thomas More, alluding to it, observes in his Utopia, that a sheep had become in England a more ravenous animal than a lion or wolf, and devoured whole villages, cities, and provinces.
Page 26 - ... was thus universally understood, both in their own age and in the times immediately succeeding, no one, on the death of an apostle, was ever substituted in his room; and when that original sacred college was extinct, the title became extinct with it. The election of Matthias by the apostles, in the room of Judas, is no exception, as it was previous to their entering on their charge. They knew it was their Master's intention that twelve missionaries, from among, those who had attended his ministry...
Page 110 - ... manuscripts of the eighth, ninth, and following centuries, written on parchment from which some former writing had been erased in order to substitute a new composition in its place. In this manner it is probable that several works of the ancients perished.
Page 160 - They lived unknown, Till persecution dragged them into fame, And chased them up to heaven. Their ashes flew — No marble tells us whither. With their names No bard embalms and sanctifies his song, And History, so warm on meaner themes, Is cold on this. She execrates indeed The tyranny that doomed them to the fire, But gives the glorious sufferers little praise.
Page 26 - ... less, would have been disobedience to the express command they had received from their Master, to go into all nations, and to preach the Gospel to every creature. If, in the latter part of the lives of any of them, they were, through age and infirmities, confined to one place, that place would naturally fall under the immediate inspection of such. And this, if even so much as this, is all that has given rise to the tradition, (for there is nothing like historical evidence in the case) that any...

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