Telling Histories: Narrativizing History, Historicizing Literature

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Susana Onega Jaén
Rodopi, 1995 - Literary Criticism - 208 pages
The proliferation of historical novels with more or less overt metafictional traits in the late seventies and eighties in Britain is a particularly arresting phenomenon at a time when historians are openly questioning the validity of the traditional concept of history understood as a scientific search for knowledge. This apparent contradiction justifies the attempt made by the contributors of this volume to analize the relationship between history and literature in English. The reader will find four preliminary essays on The End of the Classical Period establishing the characteristics of the appropriation of history since the appearance of Sir Walter Scott's historical romances with special emphasis on the Victorian novel (Dickens, Eliot, Mrs Humphry Ward), the Irish ballad and Post-Independence Indian historical fiction, as a necessary preface to the main group of essays on The Postmodernist Era devoted to establishing the common as well as the individually distinctive traits in the writings of some of the most accomplished contemporary writers in English: the more centered British novelists Margaret Drabble, Julian Barnes and William Golding as well as the more ex-centric Angela Carter, Salman Rushdie and Jeanette Winterson plus the playwright Caryl Churchill, and the black American novelist David Bradley.

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Contents

Foreword
5
ANDREW SANDERS
21
MARÍA DOLORES HERRERO
31
MARÍA PILAR PULIDO
49
FELICITY HAND
61
MARITA NADAL
85
CHANTAL CORNUTGENTILLE
103
MARÍA LOZANO
117
SUSANA ONEGA
135
ÁNGELES DE LA CONCHA
149
CELESTINO DELEYTO
163
JESÚS BENITO
181
Bibliography and Film References
193
Index
203
Copyright

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Page 14 - I'll go on, you must say words, as long as there are any, until they find me, until they say me, strange pain, strange sin, you must go on, perhaps it's done already, perhaps they have said me already, perhaps they have carried me to the threshold of my story, before the door that opens on my story, that would surprise me, if it opens, it will be I, it will be the silence, where I am, I don't know, I'll never know, in the silence you don't know, you must go on, I can't go on, I'll go on.